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ART CREDIT


innovative centers & unique venues


Columbus Perfecting the art of the event experience


For meeting planners, crafting a meeting or event goes far beyond just selecting a venue. It’s about creating an experience that not only stays in the minds of attendees for years to come, but leaves them feeling inspired, renewed, and motivated. In Columbus, Ohio, a unique collection of venues — from a 1.7-million-square-foot convention center to a revamped turn-of-the-century church — helps planners to do just that. Planners looking for an engaging ven-


ue with built-in entertainment can opt for either the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium or COSI (The Center of Science and Industry). The No. 1 zoo in the United States (accord- ing to USA Travel Guide) offers hands-on, interactive experiences for groups of up to 10,000, including private viewings of its polar-bear exhibit, up-close animal encounters, and cocktail receptions with manatees. At COSI, more than 300 exhibits and 300,000 square feet of space offer an inspiring canvas for groups of up to 5,000. Everything from the museum’s award-win- ning educational programs to its films and team of educators can be used for work- shops, meetings, and events. For events that demand a dramatic sense


of place, venues like The Ivory Room, The Bluestone, and Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens offer beautiful set- tings. A chic, new downtown space, The Ivory Room features lofty windows and panoramic city views from the sixth floor of the Miranova tower. Receptions, banquets, and other events for up to 300 guests can be accommodated at the venue, run by the award-winning team of Cameron Mitchell Premier Events. The Bluestone, with its soar- ing stained-glass windows, is an ideal ofbeat space for high-energy events. Originally a turn-of-the-century Baptist church, the three- story venue offers five rooms, an outdoor patio, two dance floors, six bars, and an on- site kitchen for events for up to 500 guests.


82 PCMA CONVENE JULY 2013


Making history After a two-year renovation, the Bluestone now offers multiple event spaces in a former turn-of- the-century Baptist church in the heart of downtown Columbus.


Natural surroundings The John F. Wolfe Palm House at the Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens offers a dramatic, Victorian-era setting for events with up to 250 guests.


The Franklin Park Conservatory and


Botanical Gardens is a premier botanical landmark and cultural attraction with both outdoor and indoor spaces for up to 500 guests. While exploring the grounds and gardens filled with exotic flora and fauna, guests can view Dale Chihuly–designed glass sculptures as well as an ever-rotating display of special exhibitions from national and inter- national artists.


For more information: Experience Colum- bus — Dan Williams, Director of Convention Sales; (800) 354-2657 or (614) 222-6105; DWilliams@ExperienceColumbus.com; ExperienceColumbus.com


PCMA.ORG


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