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ART CREDIT


innovative centers & unique venues


Seattle New experiences, same Pacific Northwest charm


New sights Last year the 175-foot Seattle Great Wheel opened at the end of Pier 57 on the Seattle waterfront. The attraction features 42 Euro-style gondolas with bird’s- eye views of the Olympic Mountains, the Seattle skyline, and Elliott Bay.


There’s just something about the majestic beauty of the Pacific Northwest that visitors fall in love with time and time again. From the fresh catch of the day at Pike Place Market to the fresh mountain air of nearby Mount Rain- ier, Seattle brings together the best of the region’s country and cosmopolitan charms. And when it comes to meetings and events, this combination adds up to create the ideal environment for meeting attendees with all the amenities planners want and need. A prime example of this mix of metro-


politan and Mother Nature, the expansive Washington State Convention Center (WSCC) offers The Conference Center (TCC), a LEED Silver–certified meeting facility in the heart of downtown. The 71,000-square-foot TCC directly connects to the 343,722-square- foot WSCC and is within walking distance


104 PCMA CONVENE JULY 2013


of Seattle’s major attractions, hotels, restau- rants, and shops. The WSCC will also com- plete a $22-million transformation later this year that not only will revamp the look of the facility, but will add even more eco-conscious enhancements to an already very green con- vention center. For smaller events and VIP receptions,


Seattle’s numerous private dining rooms and award-winning restaurants are renowned for their local seafood, produce, and wines. For larger groups, venues unique to the North- west include the Space Needle, Safeco Field (home to the Seattle Mariners), CenturyLink Field (home to the Seattle Seahawks), Seattle Art Museum, Seattle Aquarium, Woodland Park Zoo, and Seattle Waterfront and piers. And in nearby Woodinville, groups can explore more than 90 wineries and tasting rooms.


Play here Seattle’s historic Pioneer Square, known for its Renaissance Revival architecture, has dozens of art galleries, museums, shops, restaurants, and bars for meeting attendees to explore in their off time.


Planners looking for venues with built-in


activities and entertainment will find a num- ber of lively options. The Museum of History & Industry recently re-opened in a restored Naval Reserve Armory and now offers a num- ber of indoor and outdoor event spaces. At the Frank Gehry–designed EMP Museum, guests can get hands-on with music memo- rabilia and a live-performance stage, while at the Museum of Flight, groups can dine beneath historic aircraft, ride aviation flight simulators, and tour the Space Shuttle trainer used by astronauts.


For more information: Visit Seattle — (206) 461-5800; conventions@visitseattle .org; VisitSeattle.org


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