This book includes a plain text version that is designed for high accessibility. To use this version please follow this link.
ILLUSTRATION BY BECI ORPIN / THE JACKY WINTER GROUP


working smarter Sarah Beauchamp Growing On the Vine


Twitter’s new six-second-video app is being used to market events and trade-show booths and to interact with attendees. But how much can you accomplish in a matter of seconds?


T


here are a million different mov- ing parts to every live program. Because it can capture a few


moments of the action — six seconds, to be precise — and thereby provide a quick, authentic representa- tion of the experience, Twitter’s new video app Vine is starting to curl its tendrils around the events industry. Launched in Janu-


ary, Vine allows users to film short, looping clips of non-sequential video footage, with a maximum of six sec- onds per post. It’s not ideal if you want to film a substantive interview with someone, or if you want to get across any message that requires more than a six-second explanation. However, meeting professionals are finding it a fun way to connect with their attendees. “With Vine, our approach has been


more lighthearted,” said Michael Solms, marketing manager at online market- ing agency Go Local Interactive, which uses Vine when exhibiting at trade shows and conferences. “That’s the viral nature of social media — you kind of have to have a little fun with it.” Go Local first used Vine at the


Copesan 2013 Conference and Pest Control Expo, held Feb. 12–14 at the Florida Hotel and Conference Center in Orlando, posting videos of winding candy trails leading to its booth, and of Go Local employees arm wrestling.


“That was our goal, not to be sales-y,” Solms said, “but to be entertaining and


32 PCMA CONVENE JULY 2013


make it worth stopping by our booth to have some conversation.” Vine is less about selling a product


and more about selling an experience, he said. “We posted some to our Facebook page,” Solms said,


“which gave more of a look into conference life and the conference experience, and then Twitter was more like,


‘Hey, look at our booth, here’s our giveaway. Stop by!’” Solms said the time


constraint allows for more creativity. “A lot of it with Vine happens in the moment,” he said. “You’ve got to


have a creative element to what you’re doing, or it’s not going to connect with people.” Six seconds, on the other hand, can


prove to be too limiting for some uses, said Liz King, founder of New York City–based Liz King Events. Vine is not her “favorite tool,” she said, not only because of its brevity but also because of its looping feature. For interviews with people and


to provide content, King prefers to use video-app Tout, launched in 2010, because it allows for sequential, non- looping, 15-second video clips. “You can get a better-quality video,” King said, “and can actually record someone saying something about your event, and put that on Twitter.”


.


Sarah Beauchamp is an assistant editor of Convene.


PCMA.ORG BREAKOUT


6 Seconds of History


Liz King, of Liz King Events, uses Vine to capture a process, which she said works well on the app, “because you can get a second at a time and piece it together to be six seconds.” It’s effective for time-lapse photography, and she recommends it for filming a few seconds of a venue before any- thing happens to the space, then capturing more footage as the event is put together. “You can see the room go from empty to full of people, and all the design and everything,” she said, “so I think that’s really cool.”


ON THE WEB


For five tips for using Vine at events, conferences, and trade shows, read global event consul- tant Michael Heipel’s blog post at convn.org/vine-events.


Moving Pictures Screen shots from Go Local’s Vine posts at events.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116