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ART CREDIT


innovative centers & unique venues


David L. Lawrence Convention Center


The Steel City shows its green side


Green among blue The David L. Lawrence Convention Center (DLCC), awarded both Gold and Platinum LEED certification, offers plenty of stun- ning waterfront views.


Make no mistake: The David L. Lawrence Convention Center (DLCC) in downtown Pittsburgh has set the bar for new conven- tion centers being built around the world. The 1.5-million-square-foot center sits on the southern shore of the Allegheny River, offer- ing breathtaking views of the water during outdoor receptions, and getting plenty of natural light for events held indoors. VisitPittsburgh’s slogan since 2004, when


the DLCC was first built — “If you want to have a green meeting, all you have to do is show up in Pittsburgh” — took on a whole new mean- ing last year, after the DLCC became the first convention center in the United States to achieve both LEED Gold and LEED Platinum certification. Platinum is the highest level of LEED certification available. “Pittsburgh built the world’s first environmentally friendly con- vention center,” said Craig Davis, president and CEO of VisitPittsburgh, “and now we can say that we operate the greenest convention center, too.”


98 PCMA CONVENE JULY 2013


Fly away The DLCC’s new Monarch-butterfly waystation assists the species during its long migration to Mexico by providing resources like milkweed and nectar plants.


In 2009, the White House selected the


DLCC to host the G20 Summit specifically because of the building’s LEED Gold certi- fication. Now the DLCC’s dual certifications demonstrate that not only does the building itself meet high environmentally sustainable criteria, but it also operates in a highly sus- tainable fashion. “Our customers increasingly seek out green meeting venues,” Davis said,


“and the one-of-a-kind Gold and Platinum status continues to position Pittsburgh as a leader in the green movement and in the green-meetings industry.” Approximately 75 percent of the conven-


tion center’s exhibition and meeting space is lit by natural daylight. When it’s time for presentations, blackout-shading systems change the lighting at the touch of a button. By recycling 50 percent of the center’s water, the DLCC saves an estimated 6.4 million gal- lons annually. But the innovation doesn’t stop there. The convention center’s hydroponics greenhouse


and rooftop garden allow the DLCC to grow vegetables and dozens of fresh organic herbs, which are then served by the convention cen- ter’s caterer. The DLCC also recently opened a 20,000-square-foot green roof that serves as programmable event space. “Potential cli- ents simply love this outdoor space for func- tions,” said Davis. And while Pittsburgh is a great destination


for conventions, the DLCC has also become a stop for butterflies, too. As part of its ongo- ing environmental sustainability efforts, the DLCC introduced a Monarch-butterfly way- station that assists the species’ long migra- tion to Mexico. Monarch waystations provide resources like milkweed and nectar plants that are necessary for butterflies to continue the migration process by producing further generations.


For more information: VisitPittsburgh — planpittsburgh.com


PCMA.ORG


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