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World Projects


Aidastella Cruise Ship, Germany Aidastella is the tenth ship of the Aida fleet in Rostock-Warnemunde, Germany and was inaugurated on 16th March 2013. It offers space for 1097 passengers. In regards to lighting, cruise ships are highly demanding. As well as the energy consumption, the types of lighting applications are restricted with space. The quality and atmosphere of lighting in cabins and the public areas as well as the restaurants, bars, shops and sports areas also has to be energy efficient as the power is generated on board the ship. To attain its full brilliance for Aidastella, the star (Stella in Latin), Osram used specifically suitable


lights: 9,000 halogen eco lamps and 1,200 metres of flexible LED modules to ensure both white and coloured light for diverse areas. With a longer service life, the LED modules have up to 50,000 times higher operating duration than the standard incandescent lamps. This is the tenth cruise ship of the Aida


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fleet that Osram has illuminated. "Cruise ships with their complex range of demands are in reality lighthouses for lighting applications," commented Martin Nüboldt, the manager who was responsible for this project at Osram. "As one of the leading providers of maritime lighting we are highly pleased to provide light for the Aidastella."


As suppliers of innovative products and lighting solutions that range from lounges to football arenas, Osram


consistently emphasises sustainability. In the past business year, the company have


generated


more than 70% of its turnover with energy-efficient


products and solutions. Artificial lighting


is today responsible for around 20% of global power consumption and


therefore bears responsibility for a considerable amount of carbon dioxide emissions.


This becomes an important leverage factor in the fight against environmental transformation.


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