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UK CHAMBER OF SHIPPING ANNUAL REVIEW 2012-2013


THE LIFE, WORK AND CAREERS OF SEAFARERS


IN 2012 AND BEYOND


The future prosperity of UK shipping depends on industry’s ability to attract high-quality personnel to fill a variety of roles, on board ships and in shore- based maritime businesses. The UKChamber plays a leading role alongside Government and its social partners in formulating policies to support these aims


Tim Springett, Head of


Employment and Legal; and


Glenys Jackson, Head of the


Merchant Navy Training Board


S 20 CHAMPIONING AND PROTECTING


hips depend on trained, competent and motivated seafarers. However, seafaring is a career that presents unique


challenges – long periods of isolation, possibly working in hazardous regions – while a ship is frequently a seafarer’s home as well as a workplace. If the industry is to present an attractive option for its workforce, it needs to guarantee a high standard of living and working conditions, and to take effective measures to mitigate local risks that their ships might encounter.


Working conditions The ILO Maritime Labour Convention, 2006 (MLC) was adopted to provide just such a guarantee – to seafarers of all nationalities on ships of all flags. The UK Chamber played a significant part in shaping the MLC and, since its adoption, has been at the heart of discussions in Government on the legal measures that the UK will need to take so that it can ratify and implement this major international convention. It is now known that the MLC will enter into force in August this year. However,


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