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CL AS S NO T E S


lita Gals quickly introduced two sofrito recipes and two spice blends using only wholesome ingredients for authentic Latin flavor. Their products are available in gourmet specialty stores throughout NYC. More info at chulitasfamous.com. I hope to see you all this June at Reunion


2012 It will be great to catch up and have fun in Saratoga again. KATE NEDELMAN HERBST 35 HOLLINGSWORTH AVE BRAINTREE, MA 02184 781-843-5140 KATEHERBST@GMAIL.COM


communications for GoodBelly Probiotic Juice Drinks, a Boulder-based company. And by night she is a doula—nonmedical birthing assistant—in the Denver and Boulder area. She shared her passion for “helping women give birth with confi- dence” as a guest blogger for Shape maga- zine in December 2011. She has a master’s in reproductive and sexual health research from the London School of Hygiene and Topical Medicine. JACQUELINE VERNARELLI 1909 N. OAK LANE STATE COLLEGE, PA 16803 JVERNARELLI@GMAIL.COM


’04


artists and scholars up the northwest coast of Greenland in August. Her “Chasing the Light” expedition will retrace painter William Bradford’s 1869 voyage to capture images of the Arctic landscape. The trip was conceived by Zaria’s mother, artist Rena Bass Forman, but she died while planning it, so Zaria is carrying out her mother’s wishes. Her mission, she says, is to honor her mother and “artistically document the rapidly changing landscape.” ROBERT CAIAZZO 18 ROBESON STREET, APT. 2 JAMAICA PLAIN, MA 02130-2943 ROBERT.J.CAIAZZO.JR@GMAIL.COM


’05


Sebastien LeMenager married Aria Huber last year, and the cou- ple welcomed son Calder on June 28. Sebastien is a business analyst at Box, a cloud content-management company in Palo Alto, CA. He is pursuing an MBA at the University of San Francisco. Molly Greenberg earned an MPH in maternal and child health from George Washington University last May. Since then she has visited Howie Austin and


’06


Zaria Forman has been planning and fundraising to lead a team of


In Colorado Ariel Scott manages online marketing and consumer


Ali Johnson Austin ’03 in Saratoga Springs and has had a wonderful time catching up with good friends and fellow Washington, DC, residents Leslie Rosen- berg ’07, Molly Bergen ’07, Steph Drahan ’05, and Ryan Greer ’08. Molly is enrolled for an August start to an accel- erated 17-month BSN/RN program in community health nursing at Johns Hopkins.


In 2011 Clifton Park, NY, resident Maria Pflegl, UWW, received her teacher certifi- cation, completed a yearlong educational tour in October, performed with the Schenectady Theatre for Children produc- tion It’s Raining Tamales, and performed at Cohoes Music Hall in A Wonderful Life. Maria is the grandmother of Alayna, who is almost 2. ALEXANDRA RAVENER 43 VALENTINE AVENUE GLEN COVE, NY 11542 A.RAVENER@GMAIL.COM


master’s in intercultural communication from the University of Pennsylvania in 2010. As outreach coordi- nator for Penn’s of-


’07


Cara Bonning- ton received a


AT WORK The voice of Hillary T


he next time you hear a sound bite from Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, you’ll


MAY 31–JUNE 3


fice of international programs, she man- ages an international internship program and helps host foreign delegations visit- ing the campus. Chris Bendann is teaching middle school at his alma mater, Gilman, in Baltimore, MD. He teaches sixth-grade geography and eighth-grade ancient his- tory, coaches track, and works in admis- sions (just as he did at Skidmore ). He enjoys living close to home, but was sad- dened by the passing of his 16-year-old Shetland sheepdog Maggie last year. While visiting Skidmore last fall, Chris ran into Hilary Moore Millspaugh, who, he discovered, also lives in Baltimore. Taylor Parrott was engaged to Christo- pher Fincke ’08 last summer. A June wed- ding is planned. James Cunningham is interning at the US Department of Commerce in Beijing, China, and writing a thesis for his mas- ter’s degree. Marissa Block left her desk job at the Central Park Conservancy to embrace country living and learn organic farm- ing—from the West Coast for work spon- sored by Worldwide Opportunities on Organic Farms to Israel for studying per- maculture design. Most recently she was working on a production farm in rural


know that her words may have been penned by speechwriter Case Button ’06. Just weeks after graduation, the government major, business minor, and all-conference golfer scored a sum- mer intern- ship in the press office of then-Senator Hillary Rod- ham Clinton. That led to a gig as assis- tant to the deputy cam- paign man- ager for her re-election bid and then as her Capital District regional director, overseeing twelve counties from the Upper Hudson Valley to the Adirondacks. Button is now working for Clinton as a deputy to the chief of speechwriting with the Department of State. He loves his speechwriting gig, despite the


stresses and long hours. He’s passionate about helping others, and, in his estimation, that’s what Clinton is all about. He says, “I was inspired by Hillary since I was young, and I thought that by attaching myself to her, I could make a difference. I have found her to be a wonderful boss, a true champion for the under- privileged and underrepresented, and someone who knows how to make a difference in peo- ple’s lives.” So what’s the job really like? “We’re always


striving to be concise and on point,” Button says. “In terms of voice, we know how Clinton feels and speaks. We don’t always get it right— the secretary ad-libs so much, she’ll skip whole pages. But it’s another way to learn about what and how she’s thinking.” Any advice for other grads looking to land


inside the beltway? “I say, if you believe in it, then do it. Supporting someone or something in which you passionately believe will take you to places you never thought possible. Because I care deeply about what we're doing, I’m able to tap into that extra gear that makes it possible.” —PM


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CREATIVE THOUGHT


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