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conference center can also be booked for receptions, meetings and holiday celebrations. Free tours are available Tuesdays through Thursdays from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m., and on Saturdays from 10 a.m. until noon. A gift shop is open during these hours where souvenirs can be purchased, along with nostalgic reminders of the theatre’s glorious past. Tax deductible contributions are gladly accepted and the Friends of the Coleman group is always enlisting membership support for various projects, as well as the ongoing maintenance of the theatre. For more information about the Coleman Theatre, call 918-540-2425 or visit online at www.colemantheatre.org. There are other notable landmarks along Route 66 in Ottawa County. Here are a few you’ll want to experience.


Sidewalk Highway


Ottawa County is home to the last remaining sections of the original Route 66 roadway. These vintage segments of pavement are known in travel publications as “Sidewalk Highway” or “Ribbon Road” and must be traveled with some caution since they are a little bumpy and only nine feet wide.


Legend has it that Oklahoma’s budget was so tight when Route 66 was constructed that rather than covering half the mileage, officials chose to cover half the width. The longest stretch of Sidewalk Highway is located on the southern skirt of Miami. It is recognized as an Oklahoma landmark and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. To travel this section of old Route 66, stay on Miami’s


A stretch of the original Route 66 alignment winds its way through the Ottawa County countryside just south of Miami.


Main Street south all the way to the T intersection, turn right and proceed onto the narrow road, following it roughly three miles—and around two sharp curves—to a junction with the main route. A secondary section of Sidewalk Highway can be found a little farther south. Pass through the Narcissa community and continue five miles to a right turn at the Northeast Technology Afton Campus. This stretch also takes you about three miles before you reconnect with the main roadway.


Route 66 Vintage Iron Motorcycle Museum Located at 128 South Main Street in downtown Miami, Route 66 Vintage Iron Motorcycle Museum is a nostalgic marvel that opened its doors in 2006. Take a ride back in time while enjoying an impressive Evel Knievel exhibit, as well as a number of rare bikes, including a Steve McQueen Husqvarna, a 1917 Harley Davidson, a 1949 Indian Golden Scout, and the only known 1919 Australian GCS left in existence. A 2000-square foot motorcycle superstore and gift shop adjoins the museum, which is open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m., and on Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. The museum is handicap accessible. There is no admission, however, donations are accepted. Visit www.route66vintageiron.com or call 918-542- 6170 for more information.


Dobson Museum Just a block off Route 66 at 110 A Street Southwest in Miami, a stop at Dobson Museum will be rewarded with some unique historical exhibits, including a tribute to professional baseball legend Mickey Mantle and artist Charles Banks Wilson. An Indian cultural collection and an area mining display will also be enjoyed. The museum is open to the public and free of charge.


Hours are Wednesday, Friday and Sunday from 1 p.m. until 4 p.m. Phone 918-542-5388 for more information or visit online at www.route66memorabilia.org.


Mickey Mantle’s home


Known as the Commerce Comet, Major League Baseball Hall-of-Famer Mickey Mantle once lived at 319 South Quincy Street in Commerce. A museum in his honor is planned at a site on Mickey Mantle Boulevard in Commerce. Phone 918-542-6087 for more information.


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