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C A N A D I A N JANUARY 2012


V A L ELECTRALITE SUPPLEMENT TO OKLAHOMA LIVING


Bar-H-Bar Travel Center is a one-stop shop Stop by the Bar-H-Bar


Travel Center if you have a hankering for delicious barbeque, need gas or maybe a gift that was made in Oklahoma.


The new travel plaza has it all for travelers, and locals who just want to get away for a good meal or an overnight stay.


The plaza at Interstate 40


and State Highway 99 opened shortly before Labor Day. It’s an Oklahoma family-owned busi- ness incorporated under the name HBH Enterprises LP and managed by Star Fuels of Oklahoma City. Its name comes from its owner’s, the Hefner family’s longtime ranching brand. Richard Hefner said his family have been doing business in the Seminole area for more than 50 years through their large cattle operation Canadian Valley Ranch. He grew up in Oklahoma City and attended college at Oklahoma State University. He and his wife, Lisa, settled in near Prague where they raised their three children. The travel center is served by Canadian Valley Electric Cooperative, and Richard Hefner and


Canadian Valley Ranch are longtime cooperative members. The store employs 40 people. “We wanted to build a destination spot for travelers that had a unique appearance and would be something people would remember — and we’ve done just that,” Hefner said. “We stress high-quality food, hospitality and clean restrooms, and everything else a traveler would want.”


The Bar-H-Bar Travel Center has a lot to offer locals too.


The restaurant seats 40 people and serves up a mouth watering menu of Austin Blue Barbeque, including brisket dinners, pulled pork sandwiches and hamburgers. Don’t feel like barbeque? There are hearty soups, chili and a salad bar with a garden array of vegetables. You can get breakfast — everything from freshly made biscuit sandwiches to full platters with hash browns, toast and eggs any way you want them. Pizza and hot and cold deli sand- wiches are also made fresh at the center.


There is a gift shop stocked with any supplies a traveler might need and a gift section with made in Oklahoma products.


The convenience store is brimming with snacks and there is a beer cave where a large vari- ety of brands is kept at 18 degrees to ensure it’s at its coldest.


The store sells high quality cuts of Bar-H-Bar beef raised on the family’s ranches in Seminole, Major, Okfuskee and Osage counties.


The travel center has 14 modern RV sites, catering to the


largest most luxurious models to compact campers. The pric- ing for the RV sites starts at $30 a day. There are two beautifully decorated cabins at Bar-H-Bar. The cabins have two queen beds, full bathrooms, satellite television and internet. They rent for $70 a night. The gas station has eight fueling stations for cars and trucks, and three large bays for tractor trailer rigs. “We’ve created an atmosphere where peoples’ visit will be something special and give them a reason to keep coming back to see us,” Hefner said.


The power of human connections By George I have lived in Oklahoma all my


life. I was born in the Canadian Valley Electric Cooperative service area. After High School I left, not the State, just my hometown. I went to school and then worked for other electric cooperatives in Oklahoma.


After 17 years, and was afforded the opportunity to return to this area, which I jumped at and now another 27 years have passed. The longer I live here the more I am convinced that Oklahoma, United States of America, is the best place to live. There are other places that I might enjoy visiting, but not many. As for living, Central Oklahoma (rural) is my choice and I am very grateful for the opportunity that I have and have had to live right here. I plan on spending the rest of my allotted time in this dimension right here.


Oklahoma is a great place to live.


We are blessed as an energy producing state. This gives us as Oklahomans an advantage over many other areas of the country and of the world. Historically the standard of living has been improved by the increased use of affordable energy. In Oklahoma we are blessed with oil, natural gas, coal, and wind. When solar technology matures


Oklahoma will have a share of that ener- gy source also. Wind while not inexpen- sive and still subsidized is becoming a significant portion of the electric energy we consume. In especially Western Oklahoma we have the potential for much more devel- opment of this valuable wind resource. Just in today’s paper was an announce- ment that an Oklahoma company would be increasing its workforce to produce steel transmission poles which will be used to build a large, high voltage trans- mission line from Western Oklahoma to the Tennessee Valley. This will allow Oklahoma landowners to “reap the wind” in a good way.


Aggressive Oklahoma entrepreneurs in the oil and gas arena are develop- ing new technologies that are bringing Oklahoma’s old and thought depleted


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