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GILCREASE Continued from Page 16


“There are stations around the museum where artists teach painting, clay sculpture and lead other hands-on activities.”


After touring the galleries, visitors can dine in the recently renovated restaurant or step outside to enjoy 23 acres of themed gardens that demonstrate gardening styles from the American West.


Upon returning to the parking lot, an observant visitor might notice that they are tak- ing home a souvenir – the picture of Sacred Rain Arrow on their Oklahoma license plate. For information about museum hours and events, visit http://gilcrease.utulsa.edu. OL


By Jocelyn Pedersen


klahoma Living readers know how to have fun as evidenced by their choice of football as Oklahoma’s favorite outdoor event. The spirit of football blows into Oklahoma when the winds of summer change to fall. From youth leagues all the way up to the collegiate level, football fever is evident. Most Oklahoma towns offer youth leagues for grade-schoolers where they play until they start “school ball” in middle school. Girls get in on the fun through powder puff leagues.


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Tailgating is a football tradition for kids and adults alike. It doesn’t matter if it’s a youth game or a college game—fans gather to root for their favorite team, share a snack or camp out for the day.


“We get here about 9 a.m.,” Judy Hughes, an avid OU football fan said. “The game starts at 2:30 p.m. and we’ll leave between 10 and 11 p.m.” A “family divided,” some of Hughes’ relatives root for OSU, but that’s okay be- cause sometimes the OSU fans stay at the tailgate site and keep track of multiple games on the portable satellite TV they bring along. Steve Yandell’s grandfather passed football fever to Yandell’s dad, who passed it to him, and now he’s starting with his kids. “It’s all about the spirit,” Yandell said. “You’ve gotta get people’s blood pumping because we need all the fan support we


can get.” Jeff Gil- lett and his father, Mike Gil- lett echo the sentiment. They converted an old bus into a tailgat- ing haven. Complete with a bath- room and deck over the roof, the Gillett clan knows how to cheer. Mike Gillett paints his team’s logo on his head. But football is more than tailgating and kibitzing with friends; it’s also about camaraderie in a larger way through mascots and music. “Part of the OSU football tradition is seeing Pistol Pete and Bullet running out on the fi eld,” said Grant Leatherwood, OSU alumnus and fan. “We always sing Ride ‘em Cowboys and our alma mater song.” All in all, it’s an experience that Oklahoma Living readers have embraced. “That team spirit and mentality brings people together,” said Dwight Moore, OU alumnus from the Dallas area. “People like to be part of a team. Football is a way to do that.” OL


Best Outdoor Event:


Football Lindsay schools are obviously doing By Jocelyn Pedersen


no surprise this small Oklahoma school district was named the favorite for 2012.


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“We have really good community support of our schools,” Richard Brownen, superin- tendent, said. “The community holds the schools in great regard. People understand the importance of the schools to the com- munity and the educational process of the students.”


Best Rural


School District: Lindsay


Public Schools


Lindsay Public Schools was voted by Oklahoma Living readers as “Best Rural School District” Lindsay Leopards from each of the three schools stand in the courtyard with their principals and mascot.


Photo by Jocelyn Pedersen


There are approximately 1,200 students enrolled in pre-K through high school in Lindsay. The schools offer strong band, agriculture and athletic programs as well as Academic Teams, which compete regionally and statewide. Since the inception of the Academic Team program, Lindsay has had nine Academic all-staters. On top of that, Lindsay schools are actively involved with the Johnson O’Malley Association whose mission is to address the needs of American Indian students.


ommunity. That’s what Lindsay Public Schools are all about; so it’s


something right when you consider Tom Herrin, high school counselor, has worked for the school system for 35 years and Mike Stevens, middle school counselor, has been there for 21 years.


“I’m old enough to retire, but I’ll stay un- til they say I need to leave. I never wake up in the morning and dread coming to work,” Stevens said.


Students like senior, Brady Magby, echo the sentiment that Lindsay is the place to be. Magby said he’s been in Lindsay his entire life and has many friends. He said in particular that Mrs. Wilson’s geometry class is “pretty awesome.”


Along with administrators, teachers and students, parents are on board, too. Tony Sanders has three kids in school and she said, “Everyone who comes here is equal. There aren’t any cliques like in the city.”


It seems everyone works together to make


Lindsay schools what they are—a small school system with a big heart. OL


JANUARY 2012 19


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