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PAGE 4 | JULY 2011 Demystifying Your Electric Bill


relate this to the amount of energy used in the household, it’s helpful to look beyond that to understand what drives the cost of that energy. “At Tri-County Electric Cooperative we’re not looking out


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for a stockholder’s best interests—we’re looking out for you,” says CEO Jack L. Perkins. “Keeping your power affordable is one of our primary goals.” It’s hard to predict the future, but one thing seems certain:


government regulations are going to increase the cost of doing business. In early June, when this article was being written, a quick search for “government regulation emission” on Google News returned headlines like, “Greenhouse gas emission rules unlawful, Texas official says” and “EPA’s war on energy hitting pocketbooks.” Currently, elected officials are considering proposed


legislation that will affect how electricity is generated, delivered and its cost. The policy decisions they make can raise the electric bills of cooperative members. That’s why for the last three years Tri-County Electric has been urging its members to contact their elected officials through the grassroots Our Energy, Our Future campaign at www.ourenergy.coop. The pressing concern at the campaign’s inception was the Warner-Lieberman bill to cap carbon emissions, now the focus has shifted to keeping the EPA from using the Clean Air Act to regulate carbon dioxide. The rising cost of fuel combined with the rising cost of building new generation mean that electric rates will increase


Contact Us


Tri-County Electric Cooperative 302 East Glaydas P.O. Box 880 Hooker, Oklahoma 73945


Office Hours: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday - Friday


Phone: 580-652-2418 Toll Free: 800-522-3315 E-mail: info@tri-countyelectric.coop


www.tri-countyelectric.coop


ne of the most frequent questions our members ask is, “Why is my bill so high?” While the simple answer is to


even if we do nothing to address climate change. For every dollar you pay for electricity, 61 cents goes directly to our wholesale power suppliers Golden Spread and Xcel Energy to cover the cost of generating power. Federal regulations will impact that cost, but they won’t be the only culprit pressuring prices. Another 6 cents of each dollar pays for system operations and maintenance—transformers, utility poles, wire, and other items connecting you to reliable power—and prices for fuel and equipment continues to rise. Finally, to accommodate our region’s growth, new power plants will require a long-term investment of time and money. While we strive to control costs on the cooperative side


through innovation such as implementing new smart grid technologies, we encourage our members to implement energy conservation and efficiency measures wherever possible. We offer numerous resources regarding ways to save on our website, www.tri-countyelectric.coop and even have an entire site dedicated to helping you find ways to save at www.togetherwesave.com. Just visit the site, type in your zip code and start adding up the ways you can save!


Payment Options


Payment Centers (Self-service kiosks) Kiosks are located in: Beaver, Boise City, Elkhart, Goodwell, Guymon, Hooker


Online Bill Pay (Account Online) Go to www.tri-countyelectric.coop


Electronic Funds Transfer (Autodraft) Call 800-522-3315 to enroll!


Levelized Monthly Payment (LMP) Call 800-522-3315 to enroll!


Pay by Phone Call 800-522-3315 anytime.


Drop off Payment in Person 302 East Glaydas, Hooker, Oklahoma


Board of Trustees District 1


District 2 District 3 District 4 District 5 District 6 District 7 District 8 District 9


Jimmie L. Draper Erwin Elms


Ronny White C.J. Mouser Joe Mayer


W.K. Schroeder Shawn Martinez Cletus Carter Larry Hodges


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