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your CO-OP PAGE 6  JULY 2011 GOOD THINGS TO KNOW


Alternative energy options Get the facts before going off the grid


options for your home, CEC encourages you to educate yourself before making a large investment. Make sure you understand the advantages and disadvantages involved, and the energy savings versus cost of the equpment.


is seeing an increase in calls from members who are interested in alternative energy.


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Most members are interested in systems that generate part or all of their residential electricity needs using wind or solar energy. Others simply wish to learn more about solar powered appliances and other alternative energy options.


If you are considering these


ith energy prices on the rise, Choctaw Electric


The following resources provide plenty of information on wind and solar-powered systems including cost, energy savings and payback.


Before spending money an alternative energy system, it’s best to know the facts.


Choose Renewables www.chooserenewables.com


American Wind Energy Association www.awea.org


US Department of Energy www.windpoweringamerica.gov


Interested in a storm shelter? High volume of orders causes delay


members requesting in-ground storm shelters continue to pour in.


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Due to the large volume of requests— eight to ten per day—members should expect to wait at least two months before their shelter is installed.


CEC storm shelters are manufactured and installed by Hausner’s Construction in Durant. The company is moving as quickly as possible to keep up with orders, and want members to be aware of the delay.


CEC offers low interest financing to help members pay for the shelter and installation. Loan applications and details about the storm shelters are available online at www.choctawelectric. coop, or call CEC at 800-780-6486 or 580-326-6486.


hile the early summer tornado outbreaks appear to have subsided, the calls from


PLAY IT SAFE


Working with big equipment?


Stay safe by staying clear of power lines


BY GUY DALE coordinator of safety & loss control


dangerous. It seems too often we hear about workers who are electrocuted when machinery they’re working with comes into contact with overhead power lines.


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Often, these sort of tragedies occur when someone is working with a new combine, front end loader or other piece of big equipment that no longer clears a line the way their smaller machinery did.


Another factor that is often overlooked is soil condition. If the soil is dryer than usual, it may affect whether or not machinery clears power lines from year to year.


Because summer is the time when most of our members are working outside on construction projects or doing farm related chores, we at Choctaw Electric like to reinforce a few basic safety reminders:


 Before beginning on a project or task, look over the work area carefully for overhead power lines and utility poles.


f you work in construction or on a farm, you know that not only is it hard work, it can also be


 If you’re moving large machinery such as combines, grain augers, pickers,


bailers, and front-end loaders, consider the route you are traveling and make sure you have ample clearance when traveling under power lines. CEC recommends that you maintain at least 15 feet of clearance between all machinery and power lines. If you’re not sure if a particular wire is an electric wire, assume that it is. Mark off a “safe zone” and stay within it.


 Remember that soil conditions can affect clearance.


 When planning new construction, factor in the position of existing power lines.


 Be extra careful when working around trees and brush. They can make it difficult to see power lines.


Train farm hands to keep an eye out for overhead power lines. Don’t assume they will do this on their own—remind them!


Finally, if you are unsure about whether your equipment will clear a power line, please contact Choctaw Electric Cooperative at 800-780-6486. We take your safety seriously and are more than happy to help you avoid a deadly accident.


To visit with Guy Dale about safety issues, please call 800-760-6486, ext. 227.


CEC


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