This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
PAGE 2 | JULY 2011 Plant Trees Wisely (continued from page 1) “Tri-County Electric invests a significant amount of


time, money and other resources in managing vegetation in its right-of-way,” says Zac Perkins, the cooperative’s vice president of Corporate Services. “In 2011, the cooperative plans to spend around $300,000 on right-of-way management for one-third of its system. Our goal is to maintain the system on a three-year rotation.”


As a member of the cooperative, you can help us provide


safe, reliable and affordable electricity by planting trees and vegetation that are clear of our right-of-way. Trees require room to grow both above and below ground. This means that before you plant a new tree, you must identify the right kind of tree for your yard - and the right location, away from power lines and underground facilities. Talk to your nursery or the County Extension Agent for suggestions on low-growing trees that can


be planted near power lines. And as always, before you dig, make sure to contact your local One Call Center at 811 so that your local utility companies can mark the approximate location of underground lines, pipes and cables. So, the most cost effective method of right-of-way


management is the proper placement of trees outside the right- of-way by landowners. The graphic below illustrates the type of vegetation that can grow safely near the cooperative’s right-of- way. When trees must be cleared, tree removal is the most cost effective method in the long term, with radical crown reduction being second. The third and most expensive method is a slight trim of the tree which requires the cooperative to return over and over again to trim the tree. Our goal is to maintain a balance between safe and reliable electric service and the health of your trees. If you have any questions, call us at 800-522-3315.


45’ 35’ 15’ E 15’ A B C D


Before planting a tree, it is wise to consider what the mature height of the tree will be. The letters below each tree in the above illustration show the types of vegetation than can be safely planted near the cooperative’s right-of-way.


A. If landscaping is needed near right-of-way areas, choose low growth shrubs. B. Smaller trees can be planted on right-of-way edges, at least 15’ from power lines. C. Medium trees need to be planted at least 35’ away from lines. D. Large trees need to be planted at least 45’ away from overhead lines. E. Trees planted too close to the lines will always be misshapen by unavoidable pruning of limbs to prevent interference with power lines.


Edge of Clear Zone


Edge of Clear Zone


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88