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TABLE OF CONTENTS June 2011 COVER STORY: Celebrating 20 Years as Your Source for School Bus and Pupil Transportation News Activity trips, like the one shown here, are


There's a reason that Collins, Mid Bus, and Corbeil build more Type A school buses than all the other brands combined: We build a better bus. Period.


just one of the aspects of student transpor- tation that are again hurting amid school district budget cuts and skyrocketing fuel costs. Tis month we also feature conver- sations on the business of contract busing and the NSTA’s and the industry’s latest lobbying efforts in Washington, D.C. Rein- troduce yourself to Magda Dimmendaal, who this summer becomes NSTA’s first female president, and hear from smaller contractor companies on how they are rid- ing out this economic storm.


COVER PHOTO: COURTESY OF MID- WEST TRANSIT EQUIPMENT, GO AHEAD NORTH AMERICA AND THE BROOKFIELD (ILL.) ZOO.


Features:


A Magnificent Selection p. 34 Soon to be the first female president of NSTA, Magda Dimmendaal is armed and ready to


be a leading advocate for private school bus contracting … and the industry as a whole The Business of Contracted Busing:


More Money, More Problems? p. 38 Labor issues obscure potential taxpayer benefits of contracted school bus service


Call us or visit us on line and we'll get one of the best bus distributors in North America to show you the Collins difference.


u June 2011


www.stnonline.com $3.00


Volume X Issue 06


Can Activity Trips Be Saved?


Magda Dimmendaal Set to Lead NSTA


How Small Contractors Survive in this Economy


Industry Again Climbs Capitol Hill


t


Keeping the Road Open for Activity Trips p. 44


Districts are fighting to keep extracurricular trips alive, with some finding creative ways to keep these trips in the transportation budget


800-533-1850 www.collinsbuscorp.com 4 School Transportation News Magazine June 2011


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