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FSW is delighted to introduce David Burton, mathematical genius and very successful Astrologer from Australia. David and his Russian wife the lovely Elena, who is herself an expert in medieval astrology were in Kuala Lumpur recently to learn feng shui, and in the course of the week long Master Practitioners Program, impressed us all with the mathematical co-relations he picked up instantly from all the formulas used in feng shui. In this feature on the magic of numbers, David walks us through the vital significance of the auspicious numbers and how they are “hidden” beneath the numbers of the Lo Shu square and in the compass of directions – two vital tools of feng shui, in particular the supreme whole number – 9!


EVERYTHING IN FENG SHUI CAN BE EXPLAINED IN NUMBERS!!


WHY THE NUMBER 9 IS THE MOST SUPREME OF NUMBERS


also discovered that all the angles and “degrees” of the compass, the flight of the “stars” in the Lo Shu chart with 5 in the centre that is the basis of all flying star charts expressed as numbers in the three by three grid... all added up to 9! Not surprising as 9 is the highest digit before we go


T


back to 1. The Lo Shu square in Feng Shui has nine numbers placed in an arrangement with each number in each grid so that any three numbers in a straight line – whether horizontally, vertically or diagonally add up to 15, which as Lillian explained is the number of days it takes the moon to reach fullness. It doesn’t matter which way you add the numbers they add to 15. The Lo Shu square is the magic square of three. It is also the square of the planet Saturn, so 3X3 =9! Feng Shui definitely has a correlation


56 FENGSHUIWORLD | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2011


he Master Number 9 is an important number signifying wholeness and completion exactly as Lillian has taught, and while attending the recent MPC in feng shui in Malaysia, I


SE S E NE


4 9 2 3 5 7 8 1 6


N The Magic Lo Shu Square SW W NW


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