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Area Source What’s New With the


Heather Klesch, Clow Water Systems Co., Coshocton, Ohio Craig Schmeisser, Sage Environmental Consulting, Columbus, Ohio AFS 10-E Air Quality Committee, Schaumburg, Ill.


Whether you’re a consistent emissions reporter or have been fl ying under the radar, following are some frequently asked questions regarding the often misunderstood Foundry Area Source Rule.


Rule? Editor’s Note: Where applicable, references to the text of the area source rule are provided in brackets. T 28


he National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Iron and Steel Foundries Area Sources, or Foundry Area Source Rule (40 CFR Part 63 Subpart ZZZZZ), was fi rst published on Jan. 2, 2008. The rule affects iron and steel


metalcasting facilities having the potential to emit less than 10 tons per year of any single hazardous air pollutant (HAP) and less than 25 tons per year of any combination of HAPs (HAP minor sources). If your facility melts and casts iron and/or steel, either the Foundry Area Source Rule or the National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Iron and Steel Foundries (40 CFR Part 63 Subpart EEEEE) is applicable to your operation.


Foundry Area Source Rule compliance obligations de-


pend on whether a casting facility is designated as “large” or “small” and whether the facility is considered “existing” or “new.” A “new” facility is defi ned as one constructed on or after Sept. 17, 2007, including any plant reconstructed on or after that date with expenditures exceeding 50% of the fi xed cost of a comparable new casting plant. A new area


“Small” facilities have annual metal melting capacities of 10,000 tons or less if they are new, 20,000 tons or less if they are existing. “Large” facilities melt more than 10,000 tons annually.


MODERN CASTING / December 2010


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