This book includes a plain text version that is designed for high accessibility. To use this version please follow this link.
50


nanotimes News in Brief


10-07/08 :: July/August 2010


Tech Transfer // Berkeley Lab Wins Four 2010 R&D 100 Awards


F


our inventions from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Labora-


tory have been recognized with the R&D 100 award for 2010 from R&D Magazine.


The 2010 awardees are:


1. Berkeley Lab scientists Evan Mills and Rich Brown developed the Home Energy Saver, a free online tool that helps consumers identify the best, most cost-effective ways to save energy and reduce green- house gas emissions from their homes. http://hes.lbl.gov


2. Berkeley Lab scientists Peidong Yang, Allon Hoch- baum, Renkun Chen, Raul Diaz Delgado and Arun Majumdar (while still at Berkeley Lab, before his appointment as U.S. DOE’s ARPA-E Director in Oc- tober 2009) manipulated silicon to make nanowires of about 50 to 100nm in diameter, and by switching to a far less expensive manufacturing process, hap- pened to create a surface with an abundance of defects. This transformational new material, Rough Silicon Nanowires, has a rough surface that impedes phonons, the particles that transport heat, yet allows the free movement of electrons, which carry the electric charge. In this way, the scientists transformed


silicon from a bad to a good thermoelectric, marking perhaps the most important discovery in thermoe- lectricity in recent times.


The material developed at Berkeley Lab offers gre- ater stability and lower material and manufacturing costs than other thermoelectrics. Because of its low cost, it is the only existing material suited to large- scale waste heat recovery. Nearly two-thirds of all the energy produced in the world is lost as heat. More than half the energy in a gallon of gas leaves auto- mobiles as waste heat. Waste heat is a free source of energy that is almost wholly unused today because large-scale waste heat recovery has not been feasible. But Berkeley Lab has achieved a major advance in developing a new thermoelectric material made with an inexpensive, safe, and abundant element.


3. A team of Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley resear- chers including Alex Zettl, Jean Fréchet, David Okawa and Stefan Pastine used light-responsive carbon nanotubes to create the first cost-efficient, remotely triggerable, impermeable microcapsules. Chemicals on Demand microcapsules rupture and release their contents when exposed to laser light. These smart microcapsules consist of nylon spheres about the size of a grain of sand that enclose a liquid chemical sprinkled with carbon nanotubes. The nanotubes convert laser light to heat that bursts the


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83