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The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) is a global leader in the fight against illicit drugs and international crime, and the United Nations lead programme on terrorism. Es- tablished in 1997, UNODC has approximately 500 staff members worldwide. Its headquarters are in Vienna and it operates 20 field offices as well as a liaison office in New York and a permanent presence in Brussels.

UNODC works to educate the world about the dangers of drug abuse and to strengthen international action against drug produc- tion, trafficking and drug-related crime. In order to achieve this, UNODC carries out a broad range of initiatives, including alterna- tive development projects, illicit crop monitoring and anti-money laundering programmes. UNODC also works to improve crime prevention and to assist with criminal justice reform in a number of countries. Moreover, in 2002, the General Assembly approved an expanded programme of activities for the Terrorism Prevention Branch. This programme focuses on the provision of assistance to countries, upon request, for ratifying and implementing the 12 universal legal instruments against terrorism.

The three pillars of UNODC’s work are: •

Research and analytical work to increase knowledge and under- standing of drugs and crime issues and expand the evidence- base for policy and operational decisions;

Normative work to assist States in the ratification and imple- mentation of the international treaties, the development of do- mestic legislation on drugs, crime and terrorism, and the provi- sion of secretariat and substantive services to the treaty-based and governing bodies; and

Field-based technical cooperation projects to enhance the ca- pacity of Member States to counteract illicit drugs, crime and terrorism.

With the rise in transnational environmental crime, UNODC wel- comes increased collaboration with UN Environment Programme, UN Department of Peace Keeping Operations (UN DPKO), CITES and INTERPOL on these issues.

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