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ity. Besides extracting timber without authorization in a sovereign country and in violation of the local legislation, DARA-Forest con- sistently exported its timber without any certification procedure. It tried to approach some certification bodies licensed by the Forest Stewardship Council. These bodies requested documentation and elements that the company failed to provide. Yet DARA-Forest ex- ported timber in violation of a normal procedure generally required and accepted by the international forest community and gradually considered to be international “soft law”. Companies importing this uncertified timber from DARA-Forest were essentially in major in- dustrialized countries, including Belgium, China, Denmark, Japan, Kenya, Switzerland and the United States of America 51. The Panel also realized that DARA Great Lakes Industries (DGLI), of which DARA-Forest is a subsidiary, along with a sister company in Uganda, Nyota Wood Industries, is in collusion with the Ministry of Water, Land and Forests of Uganda in establishing a scheme to facilitate the certification of timber coming from the Democratic Re- public of the Congo. In May 2000, DGLI signed a contract for forest stewardship certification with SmartWood and the Rogue Institute for Ecology and Economy in Oregon, United States of America. 52. …..DGLI partners in this new scheme include DARA Europe GmbH Germany, Shanton President Wood Supply Co. Ltd China, President Wood Supply Co. Ltd Thailand, DARA Tropical Hardwood,

Portland, Oregon, United States of America. The distribution of sales of the company is thought to remain the same, about 30 per cent to the Far East, China, Japan and Singapore, 40 per cent to Europe and 25 per cent to North America. DARA Great Lakes Industries shareholding and management is between Thai and Ugandan nationals, among them John Supit Kotiran and Pranee Chanyuttasart of Thailand and Prossy Balaba of Uganda. Some unconfirmed information indicates that members of President Museveni’s family are shareholders of DGLI, although more in- vestigation is needed…. 54. The logging rate was alarming around Butembo, Beni, Boga and Mambassa. The RCD-ML administration acknowledged its lack of control over the rate of extraction, the collection of taxes on logging activities and the customs fees at the exit points. On the basis of eyewitness accounts, satellite images, key actors’ acknowledgements and the Panel’s own investigation, there is sufficient evidence to prove that timber extraction is directly re- lated to the Ugandan presence in Orientale Province. This has reached alarming proportions and Ugandans (civilians, soldiers and companies) are extensively involved in these activities. In May 2000, RCD-ML attributed a concession of 100,000 hectares to DARA-Forest. Since September 1998, overall DARA-Forest has been exporting approximately 48,000 m3 of timber per year”

Other examples on international and militia involvement in mineral extraction areas also given in the report to the UN Security Council, December 2008:

74. Mining regulations of the Democrat the Congo make a distinc- tion between local traders, or negociants, who are licensed to buy in the field and to sell to any domestic ex comptoirs, which are only li- censed to export. The comptoirs often use the excuse that, because they are not theoretically involved in buyin they are unaware of the origin of the minerals they buy. But many negociants have told the Group that comptoirs need to know where their as the ore content varies from one area to the next. In addition, these buying houses are aware of the presence of armed groups, as their t prices higher. In practice, many comptoirs work with preferred negociants who they know and trust, pre-financing their activities. These neg devel- oped close relationships with FDLR at mining sites.

75. The Group has analysed hundreds of official mineral trans- portation documen Government authorities present at transit centres where minerals arrive before being loaded onto trucks for Goma, Uvira, Butembo and Bu documents confirm that certain negociants have purchased consistently from areas controlled by FDLR and have sent the product consiste comptoirs. 76. The Group has also reviewed official export and mining min- istry documentation that indicates that certain comptoirs buying areas sell their product to a narrow range of foreign companies. The Group has learned from many negociants and the director of a foreign company that some of the foreign companies pre- finance their “own” comptoirs, in other words, acknowledging a chain of financing that flo companies down to the FDLR-con- trolled mining pit.

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