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10-03 :: March 2010

nanotimes

News in Brief

IQM. That way, the company fills a seminal market niche with space research results. The IQM project transfers comprehensive long-term space research knowledge to new terrestrial application areas. It aims at developing and manufacturing tools for generating ion and particle beams, especially high frequency ion beam sources.

The product spectrum of IQM ranges from small ion sources, such as locally limited surface treat- ment, to bigger sources for dusting materials and manufacturing and stabilizing coatings.

Head and founder of IQMl, Dr. Davar Feili, is confident because potential users find products and services of the project already appealing: “The development of ion engines for terrestrial applica- tions serves an existing need that was increasingly brought to our attention by research and industry over the last years. By manufacturing practical complete ion source systems we can now meet the requirements.”

http://www.transmit.de

Researchers from the Russian Academy of Sciences-

has been proposed a bioengineering method for

self-assembly of multifunctional superstructures

with in-advance programmable properties. The method employs two unique proteins, barnase and barstar, to rapidly join the structural components together directly in water solutions.

The properties of the superstructures can be de- signed on demand by linking different agents of various sizes and chemical nature, designated for specific goals. As a proof of concept, colloidally sta-

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ble trifunctional structures have been assembled by binding together magnetic particles, quantum dots, and antibodies using barnase and barstar. The as- sembly has demonstrated that the bonds between these proteins are strong enough to hold macrosco- pic (5nm to 3μm) particles together. © PNAS

Maxim P. Nikitina,b, Tatiana A. Zdobnovaa, Sergey V. Lukasha, Oleg A. Stremovskiya, and Sergey M. Deyeva: Protein-assisted self-assembly of multifunctional nanoparti- cles, In: PNAS Early Edition, March 15, 2010, DOI:10.1073/ pnas.1001142107:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1001142107

Researchers from Stanford University, Carnegie Institution of Washington, SLAC National Accele- rator Laboratory and National Cheng Kung Uni-

versity, Taiwan, studied mixtures of Fe, Pt, and W up to 282 GPa with 250 to 600nm size synchrotron x-ray absorption and diffraction probes. The probes readily resolve signals from individual materials, between sample and gasket, and peak pressures, in contrast to the 5-μm-sized x-ray beams that are now becoming routine.

The use of nanoscale x-ray beams also enables single-crystal x-ray diffraction studies in nominally polycrystalline samples at ultrahigh pressures, as

demonstrated in measurements of (Mg,Fe)SiO3 postperovskite.

These capabilities have potential for driving a push toward higher maximum pressures and further

miniaturization of high-pressure devices, in the

process advancing studies at extreme conditions.

Lin Wanga, Yang Dinga, Wenge Yanga, Wenjun Liuc, Zhonghou Caic, Jennifer Kungd, Jinfu Shue, Russell J.
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