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50

nanotimes

News in Brief

nanoscale, In: PNAS Early Edition, February 22, 2010, DOI:10.1073/pnas.0909240107: http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0909240107

Chemists at University of Wuerzburg and resear- chers at BASF SE have developed a new molecule that allows the manufacturing of powerful organic

thin film transistors for microelectronics. Tests

at Stanford University (USA) proved the molecule to be extremely powerful and air stable. Therefore, it is suitable for vacuum process manufacturing of electronic circuits.

10-03 :: March 2010

London, U.K., have created a three-dimensional

invisibility-cloaking structure operating at optical wavelengths based on transformation optics. The blueprint uses a woodpile photonic crystal with tailored polymer filling fraction to hide a bump in a gold reflector.

Structures and controls are fabricated by direct laser writing and characterized by simultaneous high-numerical-aperture far-field optical microsco- py and spectroscopy. Cloaking operation with large bandwidth of unpolarized light from 1.4- to 2.7-μm wavelength is demonstrated for viewing angles up to 60 degrees. © Science

Image: Octachloroperylene diimide molecules are slightly folded and, therefore, arrange themselves as seen in the drawing to the right. The extensive overlap- ping within the compound is the reason for improved properties as an organic thin film transistor. © Marcel

Gsänger

M. Gsänger, J. H. Oh, M. Könemann, H. W. Höffken, A.-M. Krause, Z. Bao, F. Würthner: Crystal-Engineered Hydrogen-Bonded Octachloroperylene Diimide with a Twisted Core: An n-Channel Organic Semiconductor, In:

Angewandte Chemie International Edition, Vol. 122(2010),

Issue 4, January 18, 2010, Pages 752-755, DOI:10.1002/ ange.200904215:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ange.200904215

Scientists from the Karlsruhe Institute of Tech- nology (KIT), Germany, and Imperial College

The findings represent a major advance in the field of transformation optics, which uses a special type of materials called “metamaterials” that can guide and control light in new ways. EU support for the work came from the three-year PHOME (Photo- nic metamaterials) project. PHOME received EUR 1.43 million from the EU‘s Future and Emerging Technologies (FET) programme, which falls under the “Information and communication technologies” (ICT) Theme of the Seventh Framework Programme (FP7).

Tolga Ergin, Nicolas Stenger, Patrice Brenner, John B. Pendry, Martin Wegener: Three-Dimensional Invisibility Cloak at Optical Wavelengths, In: Science Express, March 18, 2010, DOI:10.1126/science.1186351: http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1186351

PHOME project: http://esperia.iesl.forth.gr/~ppm/PHOME/

The German TransMIT GmbH launches a new

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