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10-03 :: March 2010

nanotimes

Companies

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sors are nonwearing, making the systems very reliable and durable. The objects are fabricated “on the fly” at a speed of 100μm/s.

in April 2010. Alimera is contracted to pay pSivida a US$25m milestone payment upon FDA approval and pay pSivida 20% profits from the sale of Iluvien™.

http://www.psivida.com

P

Image: The nanopositioning system is suitable for travel ranges of up to 100 x 100 x 100μm. The system is driven by piezo actuators and achieves resolutions of up to 0.2nm at response times in the millisecond range. © PI

http://www.physikinstrumente.de

p

Sivida Corp. (NASDAQ: PSDV; ASX: PVA), released additional positive 24 month safety

and efficacy data from the Iluvien™ Phase III FAME Study for the treatment of Diabetic Macular Edema. pSivida‘s licensing partner, Alimera Sciences intends to file a New Drug Application (NDA) to the FDA in second quarter this year. There are presently no FDA approved drugs to treat diabetic eye disease.

Following the release in late December 2009 of the top-line two year data from the FAME Study, Alime- ra Sciences raised US$10 million from its investors via the exercise of warrants. Alimera is due to be- gin monthly principal payments of US$500,000 to pSivida plus quarterly interest payments at 20% annually based on a US$15 million contingent note

VA TEPLA (TPE), Germany, specialized in high- temperature vacuum systems and crystal-growing

systems, has published its preliminary figures for fiscal year 2009. Consolidated EBIT improved to EUR16.6 million (previous year: EUR15.0 million). The EBIT margin thus rose significantly to 12.3% after 8.9% last year. The result is at the upper end of the guidance published by PVA TePla.

http://www.pvatepla.com

Q

(MRF® (SSI®

ED Technologies, the pioneer and exclusive provider of Magnetorheological Finishing ) and Subaperture Stitching Interferometry ), announces implementation of one of its new Aspheric Stitching Interferometers (ASI®

35

) at the Leib-

niz Institute for Surface Modification (IOM) in Leip- zig, Germany. The ASI is the newest in QED‘s line of full aperture metrology systems. The ASI is capable of measuring steep aspheres with as much as 1000 waves (more than 600 microns) of departure from the best fit sphere. The ASI operates without the use of dedicated null lenses or computer-generated holograms, significantly reducing the cost and lead time for producing aspheres compared to traditional methods. Aspheres are increasingly used in precision optical systems, since the use of aspheres generally results in fewer optical elements, less weight and re- duced size, thereby simplifying and reducing the cost of optical systems.

“At IOM, we put a strong emphasis on collaboration with industry, universities and other research insti- Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69