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GAME PLAY OFFSIDE


WHAT IS IT? Offside refers to a team with more players over the restraining


line than allowed. Play is stopped, and the team with too many players over the line will be penalized.


WHEN too many players on the offensive or defensive end of the restraining line


FUNDAMENTALS


OFFENSIVE A team may not have more than seven players on or over the restraining line in its offensive end.


DEFENSIVE A team may not have more than seven players plus a goalkeeper on or over the restraining


line in its defensive end. DEVELOPMENTAL


U9 - No offside in 7v7. Emphasis on stick skills over field awareness U11 - Same as U9


U13 - Offside now called and will demand greater field awareness and communication from players


U15 - Same as U13


RESTRAINING LINE One of two solid lines 30 yards up-field from each goal line and extending from one side of the field to the other.


COMMUNICATE In transition from one part of the field to another, players should communicate who is going over the line.


PLAY SAFE


Offside applies whether or not the ball is inside the restraining line.


The team with too many players will have a player moved back on side with a free position at the spot of the ball.


Players may reach over the restraining line to play the ball, as long as no part of their feet is on or over the line. Sticks may be grounded.


Players may exchange places during play, but the player leaving the offensive or defensive end must have both feet out before the player replacing her can cross the restraining line.


48


GIRLS YOUTH RULES GUIDEBOOK USLacrosse.org/GirlsRules


WHERE at the restraining lines (30 yards from each goal line.)


WHO both the attack and defense can be called for offside WHY keep play safe and fair


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