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RESPONSIBILITIES


Get involved. Offer to help keep score or time, raise funds, organize carpooling, line fields, take photos, update websites, etc.


Spectators must stand 4 meters behind the sideline opposite the team benches.


Confirm start time and game location in advance.


Be your child’s “home field advantage” by giving her unconditional support regardless of how she performs.


BEST PRACTICES


Be supportive of your child by giving encouragement, listening, and showing interest in her team. Positive reinforcement promotes learning and fun.


Research has shown that a ratio of five positive reinforcements (verbal/ non-verbal) for each negative (criticisms, corrections) is ideal for helping athletes do their best.


PERSPECTIVES


P Let the coaches coach. Refrain from giving players advice, instruction or direction during games.


P Offer positive reinforcement to coaches by letting them know they’re doing a good job.


PARENTS


After a game or practice, use open-ended questions to discuss the event with your child, such as, “What do you think your team did well?” This way your child gets to talk about things the way she saw it, not what you think she could do better.


C Explain coaching philosophy and educate parents on differences in girls’ and boys’ lacrosse rules and objectives.


O Coaches are responsible for controlling misbehaving spectators and may receive cards for their behavior.


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ROLES PARENTS


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