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VIOLATIONS


FALSE START: before the whistle, step or make any movement simulating the beginning of play designed to gain an advantage over one’s opponent.


SLOW WHISTLE: A flag indicates a major foul by the defense in the critical scoring area. The whistle will blow and the penalty will be enforced if the attack does not continue its advantage on the play.


The goalkeeper may return to her goal circle if she has moved outside the goal circle during the slow whistle (flag raised) and has not fouled.


BEST PRACTICES


Players should be taught the distance of 4 meters so they can place themselves properly during penalty administration. Failure to move 4 meters away as instructed by the official may result in a green card for delay of game.


PERSPECTIVES


P Officials blow their whistles often during games to ensure safe and fair play.


C Condition your players to respond to the sound of the whistle by using it during practice.


THE WHISTLE


The whistle has blown and the officials are setting up a free position at a hash mark in the 8m arc. If players are failing to stand on the whistle they will be returned to their original spots when the whistle was blown. A green delay of game card may be issued.


C Teach your players to take advantage of stopped play to see the field to decide where to go next.


O Use whistle tone to indicate the severity of the foul.


55


GAME PLAY THE WHISTLE


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