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SOUCY INVESTS IN METALCASTING


A manufacturer of track systems, parts, accessories and other industrial components spent more than $30 million to build a new plant next to the casting facility it just purchased, converting it from a local supplier to one of North America’s largest, most automated plants for large castings. SHANNON WETZEL, SENIOR EDITOR


S


oucy, (Drummondville, Quebec, Canada) a verti- cally integrated manu- facturing group, wanted


to add a metalcasting facility to its portfolio, alongside its plastic molding, rubber molding and compounding, polyurethane molding, machining, and assembly companies. Te group makes parts and accessories for power sports, agriculture, defense and industrial sec- tors, and incorporates critical castings in many of the components. Soucy wanted a metalcasting facility that could supply some of these castings to the parent company as well as sell to other outside customers. Spe- cifically, the manufacturing group had a need for a casting source of a large sprocket used in its track systems. It didn’t have to look far.


Within Soucy’s headquarters hometown, Drummondville, Canada, was an iron cast- ing facility amenable to a purchase. In 2010, Soucy acquired the gray, ductile and austempered ductile iron


plant with big plans in mind. Originally, the Soucy Belgen


metalcasting plant produced castings ranging from 0.5 to 125 lbs. on auto- matic green sand molding machines. It also had a small nobake molding line. But Soucy needed bigger castings for its track systems. “Soucy Group founder, chairman of


the board and CEO, Mr Gilles Soucy didn’t want a welded assembly for his track kits. He wanted castings to


improve the products and he wanted large castings,” said Jasmin Villeneuve, General Manager, Soucy Belgen. “In 2010, the foundry did not have the capability to make the big castings on a large scale, but it had the expertise. We had the knowledge and the pas- sion of the employees, so we just had to make the foundry bigger with more automation.” Te ramp-up started almost immediately after the acquisition. Soucy invested $30 mil- lion to build a brand new metalcasting facility around the existing one, adding 150,000 sq. ft. Te expan- sion consisted of a new automated nobake line capable of handling much larger castings and a new floor molding area to handle even bigger parts (up to 12,000 lbs.). “In the markets that we


Soucy Belgen’s new metalcasting facility installed induction furnaces with two power lines to withstand an outage on either line.


20 | MODERN CASTING October 2016


serve, like the agricultural tractors, the equipment gets larger and larger,” Villeneuve said. “Tis large nobake line was the perfect fit for us.”


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