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Kilrush Consultancy


COVID-19 has changed the way business is done and how payments are taken, with many business owners having to move their business from face-to- face to online and the telephone, with some busi- ness owners and/or employees now also working from home. Card data is personal data and regard- less of COVID-19, must be kept secure, because of GDPR and the contract between the business and bank (the ‘acquirer’). T is is diffi cult to do in normal times and even


more so in a home working environment. It is also critical that if payments are taken over the phone, the business can hold onto the payment after the goods/services have been dispatched/provided. When a business/merchant wants to take


telephone payments, it will normally be told to either key the card data into a terminal/card reader or to consider a virtual terminal. A virtual terminal is a web-based application used by the merchant to key enter the customer’s card data, which is verbally provided by the cardholder, then manually entered into the virtual terminal by the merchant. However, telephone payments processed in this


way are not protected for the merchant in the same way that face-to-face Chip and Pin and e-commerce payments are protected: - When a payment is made in face-to-face envi- ronments, the cardholder authenticates the pay- ment with a PIN – something the cardholder knows - Similarly, when paying on the internet, as well as entering the card number, the cardholder enters the expiry date and the 3 digits from the back of the card into the browser, and enters the requested 3 digits of their password – something they know.


Retailers beware – telephone card payment fraud a ticking time bomb


In a telephone payment, however, because the cardholder cannot


be authenticated it is classed as a non-secure payment. Consequently, liability for any fraud lies with the merchant, regardless of whether the payment was authorised when originally processed. Obviously, be- cause authentication is not required, the card data from a telephone payment is very valuable to fraudsters. In the current climate, telephone payments will become more of a magnet for fraud. A better solution for business is ‘Pay By Link’. In this scenario, in-


stead of the business taking the card information from the cardholder and key entering it into a terminal or virtual terminal, the card holder is sent a link to the acquirer’s and the cardholder enters the card data onto the acquirers hosted payment page, keeping all card data out of the merchant environment. Using this method of payment also facil- itates authentication of the cardholder, securing the card data for the merchant, moving the liability for any fraud from the merchant back to the card issuer. T is means the business can provide goods and services confi -


dent of being able to hold onto the payment, eliminating fraud related chargebacks to the retailer. After many years working in the card pay- ment industry, so concerned am I about the potential impact on our local businesses that I am willing to off er free consultancy and advice to help local traders avoid this ticking time bomb, that will, in my opinion, become a national issue in the coming months.


If you would like to know, please contact Connie G. Penn, Kilrush Consultancy Ltd, Contact connie@kilrush.co.uk, or phone 07771 804501


ALL THINGS BUSINESS 75 Connie Penn Kilrush Consultancy


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