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BASF, INTRODUCES NATUPHOS®


E


BASF has introduced its new enzyme for animal nutrition, Natuphos® E, to the European Union (EU) market. With unprecedented enzyme stability throughout various feed production processes, Natuphos®


E,


a new generation phytase, helps pigs and poultry utilize phosphorus and key nutrients more efficiently, bringing a wide range of benefits to local farmers and the animal feed industry. Customers in the EU can order Natuphos®


E from March 28, 2018. As the first company to market a phytase for feed more than 25


years ago, BASF is once again proud to be setting a new standard in feed phytase technology. Natuphos®


E is a phytase, which helps


pigs and poultry better utilize phosphorus, other important nutrients such as proteins and calcium as well as energy – bringing a wide range of benefits to the animal feed industry. The majority of phosphorus in grains and oilseeds is bound to phytic acid, an antinutritive factor found in feed. Phytate-bound


NEW COPPER CARBONATE-BASED


MINERAL FEED INGREDIENT Old Bridge Chemicals, North America’s largest manufacturer of copper and zinc compounds, has announced the introduction of Emerald-C™ copper carbonate-based mineral feed ingredient. Chloride-free and OMRI-l isted,


Emerald-C is proven to enhance animal health and performance. The free-flowing, green powder is ideally suited for humid environments. Extremely easy to handle and blend, Emerald-C is non-hydroscopic and


insoluble in water.


Benefits of Emerald-C include: • Maintains animal gut health and increases performance • Contains no sulfates or chlorides • Excellent source of carbonate for feed premix • Stable, non-reactive with other feed ingredients • Superior bioavailability optimizes copper absorption • Non-dust ing powder provides exceptional flowability • Enhanced formulation and health


phosphorus can hardly be used by animals such as pigs and poultry, and is therefore lost as a potential nutrient and excreted. As a result, manufacturers need to supplement the feed with either inorganic phosphates or very effective phytases to make sure the animals are supplied adequately with the required amounts of the essential mineral phosphorus. “Built on BASF’s long-term phytase expertise, the new generation Natuphos®


E benefits our customers with


considerable cost savings and reduces the need for non-renewable rock phosphates, contributing to more sustainable feed,” explains Anne van Gastel, Sales Europe, BASF Animal Nutrition. “Natuphos®


E has shown an outstanding effect on releasing


phosphorus and other valuable nutrients from phytate in the gut of pigs and poultry. On top of that this new hybrid phytase delivers a superior stability in the challenging production processes and conditions of premix, base mix and compound feed,” adds Dieter Feuerstein, Senior Technical Manager, BASF Animal Nutrition.


benefits versus copper sulfate • Comparable performance at a lower cost versus leading, chloride-based TBCC product Emerald-C is manufactured in the USA


at the company’s HACCP and AFIA certified safe feed/ safe food facility. Independent analyses of Emerald-C demonstrate that the product easily meets rigid EU criteria for the presence of dioxins and polychlorinated biphenols (PCBS). For further information, please contact Joanne Small at


jsmall@oldbridgechem.com.


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FEED COMPOUNDER MAY/JUNE 2018 PAGE 59


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