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Northern Ireland Full Year Figures


Total Feedingstuffs Cattle and Calf Pig


Poultry (Including IPUs)


Sheep Other


2017 Full Year Total Production (Tonnes)


2,446,200 1,274,300 225,500 798,100


67,700 80,700


2016 Full YearTotal Production (Tonnes)


2,234,800 3,938,800 207,600 754,400


65,800 74,300


111.9 per cent of the 10 year average of total annual feed production, surpassing that average by 259,280 tonnes. Cattle and calf feed accounted for 52.1 per cent of total feed


production in Northern Ireland during 2017, a further 32.6 per cent was made up by poultry feed, 9.2 per cent pig feed, 3.3 per cent other feed and 2.8 per cent sheep feed. Feed for cattle and calves was the sector that grew the most on


year earlier levels in 2017; total production amounted to 1,274,300 tonnes, a 12.5 per cent or 141,700 tonne increase on the previous year’s output. Production levels for 2017 were only second to 2013’s record return, however, it was still 10.8 per cent or 123,800 tonnes over the 10 year average of cattle and calf feed. Total yearly pig feed production, at 225,500 tonnes was 8.6


per cent higher than the amount produced in 2016, a 17,900 tonne rise. 2017’s manufacturing output was also 31.3 per cent or 53,700 tonnes greater than the average for the last 10 years and the highest production level since the turn of the millennium, only falling behind the three years of 1996-98. Total poultry feed manufactured increased by 5.8 per cent in


2017 with 43,700 tonnes more produced than in 2016. At 798,100 tonnes 2017 was a record year for production and surpassed the ten year average by 81,100 tonnes or 11.3 per cent. The largest portion of the increase came from a 15.4 per cent or 37,600 tonnes rise in the amount of layer and breeder feed produced across the year. Total sheep feed rose 1,900 when compared to 2016, finishing


at 68,000 tonnes, an increase of 2.89 per cent. Despite this growth, 2017 was only at 96.85 per cent of the 10 year average, with the year falling 2,200 tonnes below the trend. Other feed production in 2017 increased by 8.61 per cent or 6,200


tonnes from the previous year’s total to 80,700 tonnes. This was also 104.40 per cent of the 10 year average. The general trend of feed production in Northern Ireland is an


upward one. In addition to the fact that 2017 was a record year in terms of production levels, all individual sectors increased their output from the previous year (see table above). All but one sector saw production levels above of the 10 year trend, with pig production a notable 31.26 per cent above the average. The one anomaly was sheep feed manufacturing which fell below the 10 year average by 3.15 per cent, however, that average is skewed slightly by the bumper years of 2012-13 which stand at 7.58 and 17.17 per cent above the average respectively.


PAGE 8 MAY/JUNE 2018 FEED COMPOUNDER


2016 to 2017 Percentage Change +9.5


+12.5 +8.6 +5.8


+2.9 +8.6


GREAT BRITAIN


February Production Figures As of January 2018 Defra is no longer responsible for the release of the monthly feed statistics for Great Britain. From this point on they will be collated by the Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board (AHDB). The AHDB released the animal feed production statistics for February 2018 on 4th


April. Total production of compounds, blends and concentrates,


including integrated poultry units (IPU), during this period was 1,138,900 tonnes, 40,600 tonnes or 3.7 per cent greater than in the corresponding month a year earlier. Furthermore, total production of compounds, blends and concentrates, including IPUs was 76,530 tonnes or 7.2 per cent higher than the 10 year average (2008 to 2017) for the month and is the highest the total has been throughout those 10 years. Total feed production during February 2018 consisted of: 40.9 per


cent poultry feed (including IPU), 32.4 per cent cattle and calf feed, 12.3 per cent pig feed, 10.9 per cent sheep feed, 2.4 per cent other feed and 1.5 per cent horse feed. Feed for cattle and calves grew by 17,900 tonnes or 5.2 per cent,


when compared with the same period in 2017, to 363,800 tonnes, the second highest total for the month since records began in their current form in 1992. 2018’s total stands 23,000 tonnes or 6.8 per cent higher than the 10 year average production of cattle feed for the month. Notwithstanding a 200 tonne or 2.9 per cent drop in cattle protein


concentrates to 6,800 tonnes, February was a month of growth across cattle a calf feed. Total calf feed reversed the reduction shown in January’s figures and rose 1,100 tonnes or 5.6 per cent from 2017 levels to 20,600 tonnes. Compounds and blends for dairy cows both reached higher levels than during the same timeframe a year earlier, growing 2,400 tonnes or 1.5 per cent and 5,900 tonnes or 8.1 per cent to 163,000 tonnes and 78,600 tonnes respectively. At 66,600 tonnes, all other cattle compounds increased by 6,100 tonnes or 10.1 per cent when compared to February 2017 output. All other cattle blends expanded at a similar rate, with monthly production growing by 2,700 tonnes or 10.5 per cent, to 28,300 tonnes. At 140,000 tonnes, pig feed production for the month grew by


4,900 tonnes or 3.6 per cent from year earlier levels. February’s 2018 total also stands at 12,000 tonnes above the 10 year average for the period, a 9.4 per cent increase. All divisions of pig feed grew, with the exception of pig starters


Comment section is sponsored by Compound Feed Engineering Ltd www.cfegroup.com


10 Year Average Production (Tonnes)


2,186,900 1,150,500 171,800 717,000


69,900 77,300


2017 as a


Percentage of 10 Year Average


111.9 110.8 131.3 111.3


96.9 104.4


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