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re you ready for the big move? Life on land is different in many ways and joining a company, commuting and doing a 9-5 job is the complete opposite of the time spent on board the yachts. Apparently, you also have to pay tax - imagine that!


ONBOARD asked James Ward CEO and Founder of Marine Resources, who specialise in assisting yacht crew to find positions onshore, to give us his top tips and recommendations for yacht crew who might be thinking of moving shore to start a new life.


“The first and most important thing to do is think long and hard about this massive change,” James says. “You must realise that life could be 100% different on dry land compared to the busy globe trotting and highly rewarding job you’re thinking of leaving onboard the yachts.”


services, business development, HR and so on. This is where you need to think about how you can bring your expertise to the company in a beneficial way. The companies themselves will be very keen to employ people who have a direct and intimate knowledge of yachting. They will want people who understand the metrics of the owners, charterers, senior crew and so on. How to engage with customers is key and the experience you could bring a land based business could be vital. The employer will highly value your ‘hands on knowledge’, you just need to figure out how you can best deliver those skills to any possible employer.”


“My top tip here,” James continues, “is to look at those more secondary touch points I mentioned before. Everyone else will be looking for those onshore positions that they have personally seen onboard. The yacht agent, direct contact points within shipyards, frontline people at marinas and ports, but think of


Highlight the skills and experience you have that can be transferred to this land based job, and remember that sea time, for example, might not be overly relevant. This of course means that you will probably have to adapt your CV for each separate role you apply for


That’s not to say it could be a bad move, of course not, but you need to manage your expectations, talk to other ex-crew who have jumped ashore - basically do as much research as possible and talk to as many people as you can, to get a clearer idea of what you might want to do and how the whole experience is going to change your life.


James continues to explain, “When thinking about how you can transfer your current skills to a shore based role, you need to broaden your scope of possible businesses that you could join. Throughout your career onboard you will come into ‘direct’ contact with land based businesses; provisioners, brokers, other suppliers, shipyard personnel and management companies, but the depth of other businesses that are perhaps more ‘behind the scenes’ is even bigger. In the UK alone, there are roughly 250,000 people working within the marine industry. Now, amongst this number, a large percentage work in the more commercial sector, but there is still a massive amount of possibilities for bringing your skills onshore into a sector that you may not have thought about.”


The main sectors of employment are; boat manufacturing, repair and retail distribution, brokers, business services and support, equipment manufacturing and sales, training or recruitment plus the marinas and ports.


James continues, “Throughout a yachtie’s career they would have come into direct touch with actually a very small part of the marine industry first hand. For example - shipyards; within a shipyard it’s like any other sort of service industry. They will have a huge team ‘behind the scenes’; sales and marketing departments, after sales and warranty departments, customer


those secondary points I talked about, not so many people will be targeting these positions, and they are just as important, challenging and rewarding. But, the competition to grab these open positions will probably be far less.”


As with everyone else looking for a new career, you need to do your homework. Do the research on the sector where your skills can be best utilised, talk to other yachties who have transitioned ashore, find out how you can best present yourself as a valuable asset and recruit. As James mentioned before, think out of the box, there are many businesses that you might not have come into direct contact with that would be a great fit for an ex-yachtie.


The starting point James explains is adapting your CV. “Crew CVs are very specific, they are presented in a unique way, worded in a certain way and only contain the very pertinent information necessary for the crew recruiters and captains to make their shorts lists of possible new recruits. In the ‘real world’ onshore, CVs need to be presented in a slightly different way. You must remember that perhaps the CV will initially be vetted by an HR professional that is a little less familiar with ‘yachtie’ lingo’, so make sure you produce a CV and use wording that is a little more pertinent to the job you are applying for. Highlight the skills and experience you have that can be transferred to this land based job, and remember that sea time, for example, might not be overly relevant. This of course means that you will probably have to adapt your CV for each separate role you apply for.”


But what about the qualifications, experience and skills you have gathered during your time at sea? James has a crucial piece of advice here, “Just as you would gather your relevant yacht qualifications, you will now perhaps need to gather some other


ONBOARD | AUTUMN 2021 | 61


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