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NAVIGATOR TRABUXU BISTRO


The owners have one mantra; to provide customers with the finest quality food, a wonderful atmosphere and excellent service. This is their recipe for success. The selective and seasonal menu of fresh fish, meat and pasta ensures patrons are guaranteed a quality dining experience. The attentive and vibrant serving staff are ready to recommend a wine from their extensive wine list, to complement your meal. Bookings are recommended. €€


GUZE In one of Valletta’s oldest houses said to have belonged to the city’s main Maltese architect (Girolamo Cassar), you’ll find Guzé. This intimate restaurant serves consistently excellent food in an elegant but relaxed limestone-and-white-linen interior. Equally good are their perfectly cooked fresh fish dishes and the large value for money filet steaks. The carpaccio of sea bass and panatone are both subtly delicious, also save some space for the hot chocolate pudding. €€


DRINK CAFE SOCIETY


A cosy bohemian little bar with a snug at one end and elegantly designed limestone steps of St John’s Street at the other, Café Society is ideal both for a quick swig or a whole chilled-out evening. Plenty of choice at the copper-topped bar includes an ever changing list of interesting cocktails that are a twist on the usual recipes.


TICO TICO This tiny, quirky little bar has taken over a stretch of the narrow pedestrian alley outside with colourful


tables, seats,


and pink velvet armchairs. A less-seedy reincarnation of the Tico Tico that once served the sailors of the Royal Navy here on Valletta’s Strait Street, nicknamed The Gut, The interior is decorated with photos of afore mentioned sailors, film posters and a model gallerija (typical Maltese wooden balcony) hung with ladies’ underwear. Grab an aperitif, head outside, and watch the liquorice all-sorts of the new Strait Street clientele go by.


PANORAMA TERRACE Watch the sun set over the Grand Harbour as you sip your cocktail, aperol, beer or whatever takes your fancy. By day observe the boats beetling back and forth across this most famous of Mediterranean safe havens. And by night see the lights sparkle on the water beneath the floodlit bulk of Malta’s oldest fortress. This bar and restaurant thoroughly lives up to its name and the balcony terrace of the bar is the perfect spot for that well earned aperitivo with a truly spectacular view.


KINGSWAY


Sip an Aperol Spritz or a Singapore Sling at small circular tables on Republic Street while watching the world go by on Valletta’s main drag. Or find a quieter corner in the small smart mirrored interior. Café by day, bar by night, Kingsway is beloved of locals and visitors alike. A new favourite place for a pre-dinner drink among Valletta’s movers and shakers.


ESSENTIAL VALLETTA


GRAND HARBOUR MARINA 35°53’15”N 14°31’10”E VHF 13


Tel +356 21 800 700


Website www.cnmarinas.com/grand- harbour-marina/ No. of berths 100 superyacht berths Max length 135m Draft 5m


BUCKET LIST


HAL SAFLIENI HYPOGEUM A Unesco World


Heritage triple-


layered subterranean tomb complex. Carved in parts, beautifully from the living rock: here the temple people buried their dead in the fourth and third millennium BC.


UPPER BARRAKKA GARDENS Situated near the Auberge de Castile and adjacent to the Malta Stock Exchange formerly the Garrison Chapel built in 1855-1857 by the British Empire stationed in Malta, the gardens overlook the Grand Harbour. From the balcony you can catch one of the very best panoramic views of the city and its surrounding area.


STRAIT STREET Long-known as The Gut, it was the city’s red light district – once popular with the sailors of the Royal Navy. After they left, the street fell into near dereliction, but is now rising Phoenix-like as the gentrified centre of the capital’s nightlife.


NATIONAL MUSEUM OF ARCHAEOLOGY Renowned as one of the most elaborately


decorated Baroque


buildings in the city, it was constructed in 1571 to serve as the official residence of the Knights of the Order of St John who originated from Provence in France. The museum provides the visitor with a good introduction to the prehistory and early history of the Maltese Islands, and acts as a catalyst to other archaeological sites in Malta.


ONBOARD | AUTUMN 2021 | 127


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