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REGISTRATION


ISLE OF MAN The Isle of Man’s yachting cluster is centred around its highly successful International Ship Registry, voted ‘Best Shipping Registry 2020’ and performing strongly in the Paris MoU White List. The Ship Registry is open to commercial yachts over 24m and pleasure yachts of any size. The Ship Registry’s Survey Department is adept at applying the new REG Yacht Code and is always on hand to offer pragmatic advice. Surveyors are based in key yachting locations including Palma de Mallorca and South of France. The Ship Registry also boasts industry-leading systems which include the ability to issue digital certificates and carry out remote inspections. A fast, professional service at low cost makes the Isle of Man an ideal choice for ship and yacht registration. With 24/7 response and a growing network of surveyors in key locations the Ship Registry provides a swift response to allow owners and managers to keep their ships operating in a competitive global industry. Backed by a government which strongly supports the maritime sector, the registry is operated on a cost-neutral platform, allowing its fee structure to be extremely competitive. The registry is dedicated to offering a pragmatic approach to regulation with a focus on finding solutions and building relationships. For more details Tel: +44 (0)1624 688500 or visit www.iomshipregistry.com


The Isle of Man survey team has developed a unique scheme aimed at helping a commercial yacht navigate Port State Control (PSC)


The detention percentage fell slightly to 2.81% (from 2.96% in 2019). The number of detainable deficiencies decreased to 1,942 (from 2,964 in 2019). The number of inspections carried out was 13,148. Clearly a substantial decrease to 2019: 17,913.


The Paris MoU applies largely to the world of commercial vessels, a far cry away from the superyacht industry. And flag states’ performances across the world fluctuate a little in the right direction with 39 countries on the White List, 22 on the Grey List and 9 on the Black List.


Despite sitting comfortably at 13 (UK MCA) and 18 (IoM) in the middle of the White List the UK and Isle of Man registers are not complacent. The MCA is particularly proud of the direct personal contact it offers its clients and its current goals are ‘to digitise every process that can be digitised’ and simplify the fee arrangement. Marshall adds, “We are also fully committed to the decarbonisation of the maritime industry and have taken a leading role in this process internationally, supporting innovation through regulatory flexibility. We are modernising crew training and certification to ensure the crew of tomorrow are properly prepared for the new challenges they will face.”


The IoM has similar goals to satisfy its clients. “We know that yachting is the ultimate fast paced environment and clients can’t be sitting around waiting for a flag state to take a decision. So we undertake that we’ll be quick to react and we’ll work with our clients to find a pragmatic solution to their regulatory issues,” explains Mitchell. The Register also recently launched the first ever flag state sponsored crew welfare app called ‘Crew Matters’ which allows access features such as live exercise classes and mental health support.


BEYOND THE HORIZON Changes on the horizon include the recent introduction of the Ballast Water Management convention and the D-2 dates are coming due at the present time; this is the date by which yachts with ballast tanks must have a Ballast Water Treatment system fitted. The date is aligned with the renewal date of the yacht’s IOPP certificate.


Cyber risk is another feature of the future and IMO requires any yachts that have Safety Management Systems to address potential cyber risks. Mitchell adds, “For yachts which are not required to have a Safety Management System, it is still a good idea to consider these risks!”


With climate change, cyber threats and an ever more digitised world, cruising on a yacht is not necessarily always plain sailing, but the support of a robust, respected ship registry will help keep you steering a good and compliant course through the choppy waters of life on the open seas. “Fair Winds and Following Seas.”


ONBOARD | AUTUMN 2021 | 193


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