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CCR2 – Affordability, Vulnerability,


and Open Banking Published in March’s edition of CCRMagazine


Assessing the affordability and vulnerability of credit to an individual customer is one of the most difficult, but also one of the most important tasks facing the credit industry today. However, creditors have been quick to rise to this challenge, and the prospects of Open Banking may give further options to different forms of creditor, if customers can be persuaded that it is their interest to allow their details to be shared. These, and other, crucial issues will be at the heart of CCR2 – articles in this edition may include:


l The prospects for Open Banking. l What is the value of an affordability score? l What technological changes will Open Banking require from your organisation?


l Making truly individual decisions on your customers. l To what degree does speed matter in risk assessment? l Making risk decisions for today and for the future. l What skills do you need? l Marrying up your external and internal data – how can they be made to work together?


l Understand your responsibilities for Open Banking. l How can you explain to customers about your


requirements for their data – getting a message across.


l The role of credit bureaus. l Finding advice and guidance on Open Banking. l Putting the customer at the heart of everything that you do.


l Planning and progressing a new project.


Feature Focus – Portfolio analysis and segmentation How can you successfully analyse your debtor portfolio to ensure the right treatment for the right customer at the right time?


How To Guide What should you look for in a consumer debt collections agency?


More Details If you would like to be part of this important edition of CCR2, or to contribute the Feature Focus or How To Guide, contact Gary Lucas on 07785 268404 or at gary@ccrmagazine.co.uk.


Deadlines Editorial – Tuesday 19 March


Advertising – Thursday 21 March


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