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NEWS...


Into Film Festival 2017 now open for bookings – and it’s completely free!


Bookings are now open for the Into Film Festival 2017 – the world’s biggest, free, youth film festival, which takes place from November 8th to 24th with 3,000 free screenings and events for 5-19 year-olds, many linked to subjects in the curriculum. Open to schools, colleges, youth leaders and home educators the Festival uses the magic of film – from exclusive preview screenings of new blockbusters to popular classics - to engage young minds in a broad range of topics. Building on the success of last year, which saw over 470,000 people attend, this year’s Festival seeks to actively involve 500,000 young people and educators from all backgrounds and corners of the UK in watching, reviewing and making films, some for the first time. With support from all the major UK cinema chains and venues ranging from the British Library, the V&A, the BFI Southbank and Pinewood Studios to a secret bunker in Scotland, a farm in Wales, and an


Ark in Northern Ireland, the Festival provides access to the big screen at its best, including IMAX screens and the 3D and 4D experience. Over 130 films are confirmed to be screened in 600 venues across the UK – the Festival’s biggest reach yet.


The annual celebration of film and education is made possible by support from the BFI, Cinema First, a wide collaboration with UK cinema industry partners and delivery partners National Schools Partnership. In a survey of teachers who attended last year, 94% of teachers said the Festival activities were useful in helping to deliver the curriculum, 94% of teachers felt the Festival activities were valuable in terms of the broader education of young people and 82% of teachers said that the Festival has made them more likely to use cinema visits to support the delivery of the curriculum.


www.intofilm.org/festival


ACS Hillingdon welcomes new Head of School


students from the local community as well as from around the world, and providing a wealth of learning opportunities. I’m proud to join that tradition.”


“It’s an exciting time to be joining the school with the current development projects, including the opening of the school’s new science centre this September. I look forward to getting to know the ACS families and the community in and around Hillingdon this year.”


Local independent international school, ACS Hillingdon, has appointed Martin Hall as Head of School and Christina Decu as Dean of Admissions. Martin commented: “I’m very pleased to be taking up the position as Head of School at ACS Hillingdon. For over thirty years the school has championed international education, welcoming


Martin has taken over from Diane Hren, who served as interim Head of School at ACS Hillingdon during the 2016-17 school year. Diane will be returning to her former position leading the ACS Central Education team. Christina Decu also joins ACS Hillingdon as Dean of Admissions following her role at the Western International School of Shanghai (WISS). She has wide-ranging international education experience having worked in Germany, the USA, and since 1992, in Shanghai. Prior to working at WISS, Christina was Director of Admissions and Marketing at Shanghai Rego International School. Christina commented: “I’m a great supporter of the International Baccalaureate philosophy, so


4 www.education-today.co.uk


I’m thrilled to be joining ACS Hillingdon. As an IB World School, it is renowned for its first-class international education and excellent teaching, and I’m excited to contribute to its continuing success.”


www.acs-schools.com/acs-hillingdon September 2017


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