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ONLINE NEWS PointsBet launches in New Jersey G


lobal sportsbook operator PointsBet has launched its online sports betting product in New Jersey. Wagering is now available on different sports all over the world, including all professional and college leagues in the U.S. The company makes its debut in the U.S. on a fully compliant app, enabling bettors to have legal access to betting on their


favourite sports. Through a partnership with both the Meadowlands and Tioga Downs, PointsBet aims to provide a premium sportsbook that encourages bettors to move away from illegal offshore options. “We’re extremely excited to bring PointsBet’s premium and game-changing sportsbook and signature betting options to the U.S.,” said PointsBet U.S. CEO Johnny


Aitken. “By offering some of the world’s sharpest betting offers and prices, we have the back of all sports bettors, no matter how sophisticated they are, and we’re serious about offering a one-of-a-kind VIP betting experience.”


AGA allays Wire Act opinion concerns T


he American Gaming Association (AGA) has attempted to address concerns over the US Department of Justice’s revised opinion on the Wire Act by insisting that states and tribes are still able to offer regulated online gaming.


The revised opinion, which was published to clarify an opinion on the Wire Act that was issued in 2011, stated that the law’s prohibition should apply to all forms of gambling in the US, and not just sports betting.


Assistant Attorney General for the Office of Legal Counsel (OLC) Stephen Engel issued the revised opinion in response to a request from the DoJ’s Criminal Division to reconsider the original opinion, which paved the way for the roll-out of online gambling in a number of US states.


Concerns have been raised as to how the decision will impact those states that currently offer regulated online gambling. However, Sara


gaming on a state-by-state and tribal basis, or for companies to provide the exciting products and entertainment experiences our customers want.”


Slane argued that gambling is one of the most highly regulated industries in the US, saying more than “4,000 regulators and billions of dollars are allocated to compliance” in the sector: “We will work with all stakeholders to preserve the ability of states and tribes to regulate gaming, and we encourage [the] DOJ to investigate and shut down illegal, unregulated gambling operators who prey on consumers.”


Enteractive ready for ICE debut E


nteractive has confirmed it will be exhibiting at ICE for the first time this year, showcasing its range of innovative player retention solutions. Delegates heading to stand N9-252 will be able to find out more about the company’s innovative (Re)activation Cloud service, which is designed for comprehensive player reactivation. The solution, which was first unveiled ahead of SiGMA in 2018, is the iGaming industry’s first AI-driven platform for large-scale personal player retention and win-back.


Operators connect to Enteractive’s proprietary platform for player reactivation and activation with 100% maintained real-time control, where they can re-engage with their player base through Enteractive’s one-to-one personal conversations, which results in up to 50% of players re-depositing. In addition, (Re) activation Cloud safeguards both operator and customer data to ensure it adheres to the most stringent of regulatory frameworks as well as responsible gaming measures. Enteractive CEO Mikael Hansson said:


“Following a hugely successful SiGMA at the end of last year, we’re all set to make our debut appearance and showcase our highly-effective retention products at ICE 2019. As new regulation kicks in that will affect the way in which operators can target their customer base, now is the perfect opportunity to consider new approaches to player engagement.”


Relax Gaming partners with Hacksaw Gaming R


elax Gaming has agreed yet another new Powered By plat-2-plat partner, Hacksaw Gaming. Under the terms of the agreement, Hacksaw Gaming’s range of 26 scratch card games will go live on Relax Gaming’s platform, adding to an offering that now comprises more than 280 games. The deal sees


72 FEBRUARY 2019 CIO


scratch card products integrated into Relax’s platform for the first time.


Daniel Eskola, Relax Gaming CEO, said: “We pride ourselves on offering a powerful range of content to suit the needs of any operator and adding Hacksaw Gaming’s new take on scratch cards is an exciting new proposition. Its commitment to innovation stood out to us, and we are certain that our operator


partners will love their games.” Marcus Cordes, COO at Hacksaw Gaming, said: “Expanding the reach of our growing range of pioneering products is a key priority as we enter 2019, and we are pleased to be doing so with a platform that is gathering so much momentum.”


Slane, senior vice-president of public affairs at the AGA, said there is no immediate need for operators and their partner companies to be worried: “It is unfortunate that the Department of Justice departed from well-established practice in reversing its previous opinion without a compelling reason to do so. However, the 2018 OLC opinion does not impact the ability for states and tribes to legalise and regulate


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