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By Paulo A. Azevedo, José Carlos Matias and Nelson Moura


“I’m satisfied with what we


“I’m satisfied with what w


T 18 AUGUST 2020


he restructuring and tighter regulation of the city’s junket industry is something that he is particularly proud of, especially because gaming revenue kept on growing for most of his term in office. The former DICJ


director also hinted that stricter rules for junkets could be in the pipeline, fended off criticism over the Government’s decision of extending the Macau Jockey Club’s concession, and dismissed suggestions of any clash with the new Secretary for Economy and Finance Lei Wai Nong


Some people say that a magistrate, before retiring from his career, should never work for another branch of power. Namely, the executive branch.Do you agree with this opinion? P. M.C. - I don’t know who said that, but for me it’s indifferent. When I am in a different role, I will play that role properly. So, if I was in the public administration, I would take into consideration that its structure, its philosophy, is to respect the hierarchy and work for the public interest.


After four and a half years at the helm of the gaming watchdog, Paulo Martins Chan has returned to the Public Prosecutions Office and has been replaced by Adriano Marques Ho. In an exclusive interview with Macau Business, Chan reviews the main achievements of the Gaming Inspection and Coordination Bureau (DICJ) under his leadership.


accomplished”


Whereas, in the judicial power, you work for what we call the material justice. You seek the truth and, then, you try to achieve material justice. So, it’s quite clear what is my role and, in different roles, I act differently.


Let me ask you, very bluntly. Was it your decision to leave? P. M.C. - Yes. Although I know that many people believe I was pressured to leave. Let me explain something. My appointment was renewed


every year until the 1st of December of the following year. According to the law, I had to inform the government of my intention to stay or go, two or three months prior to that date. The problem was that the new executive would be appointed on the 20th of December and I spoke to the former Secretary and he told me that it would be better if I stayed for the meantime and, if necessary, I could then leave and a new director would be appointed. I accepted his suggestion and I stayed, but the new Government, as it took over, knew I was on the way out. I waited until they found someone else and I left in this month of June.


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