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RENEWABLE BLACK PELLETS TRIALLED IN FINLAND AS A COAL SUBSTITUTE


Clean Electricity Generation (CEG) and Turun Seudun Energiantuotanto (TSE) have announced the successful logistics, handling and combustion trial of over 1,000 tonnes of CEG renewable black pellets at TSE’s coal-fired power unit Na2 in Naantali power plant, Finland. The pellets, produced from


sustainably sourced biomass, served as a drop-in substitute for fossil coal in the co-firing trial. The renewable black pellets were


produced at CEG’s high temperature Torrefaction facility in Derby, UK, and transported by ship to Naantali, Finland. In Naantali, the pellets were


stored outdoors, uncovered and exposed to rain and normal autumn weather conditions. The pellets were then conveyed to the unit Na2 power block’s coal silos and mills, and ultimately the coal-fired boiler unit. The objectives of the trial were to


evaluate replacement of fossil coal with torrefied pellets, demonstrate that the fuel switch from fossil to renewable can occur without significant investment at the power station, and prove that CEG pellets can withstand outdoor storage for a certain time. CEG renewable black pellets were high energy and demonstrated


hydrophobic behaviour, standard coal handling, efficient combustion and good grindability. TSE is further evaluating the detailed technical performance of the pellets, as the basis for a fuel replacement decision.


BIRMINGHAM BOOSTS GLOBAL CLEAN ENERGY PROSPECTS


British and German experts from industry and academia will create a new ‘Innovation Hub’ based in Birmingham to deliver new approaches to energy and waste management that will benefit cities and communities in China and around the world. Energy experts from the


University of Birmingham and Fraunhofer UMSICHT have renewed their Joint Research Platform set up in 2016, with plans to locate collaborative research in a new centre at the city’s Tyseley Energy Park. Set to open in 2021, the Hub


ENERGY AUDIT TOOL LAUNCHED


DNV GL has developed an energy audit tool to easily audit multiple business sites and help customers save money by optimising existing technologies, such as lighting, ventilation, air control and server rooms. The new tool comes as the Article


8 of the European Energy Efficiency Directive is being adopted. The legislation requires all large


enterprises based in the European Union to comply with the national energy audit obligation, including calculating their total energy consumption and identifying saving opportunities across their estate, every four years. Organisations with multiple


operations across Europe must meet the legislative requirements of every Member State they operate


in. All 28 countries have their own specific audit requirements. DNV GL’s new tool automatically


calculates energy balances and energy saving opportunities, using an algorithm to calculate average energy use in case of missing data, and allow for easy benchmarking. Using the new tool, best practices


can be identified and shared across multiple sites.


will link to the creation of a technology transfer centre in China in partnership with Jiangsu Industrial Technology Research Institute (JITRI), in Nanjing, and funded through Research England’s International Investment Initiative (I3) programme. BEI director, Professor Martin


Freer said: “In establishing the Innovation Hub, we’re looking to develop collaborative research programmes related to waste processing and recycling - in particular the development of technologies capable of delivering biofuels.” The partnership between BEI


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and Fraunhofer UMSICHT has been cemented through a series of new research programmes and development of a Thermo- Catalytic Reformer plant at Tyseley Energy Park. Thermo- Catalytic Reforming (TCR) technology has been developed by Professor Andreas Hornung, chair in Bioenergy at the University of Birmingham and director of the Institute Branch, Sulzbach- Rosenberg, Fraunhofer UMSICHT.


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