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SICKNESS ABSENCE PICKS UP IN MANUFACTURING


Make UK has published its Absence Benchmark, the annual survey of days missed by employees due to sickness in the manufacturing industry. According to the


benchmark the overall absence rate increased slightly in 2018 to 2.3 per cent, up from 2.2 per cent in the previous year. The average number of days a year lost to sickness absence per employee also increased slightly to 5.3 days, up from five in 2017. At an average of 6.8 days, manual employees lost significantly more days to sickness absence than those in non-manual roles, who missed an average of 3.9 days a year. There were differences in the number of


sick days taken between larger and smaller companies too. Smaller companies, with a workforce of up to 50, saw employees each miss on average 4.2 days a year (3.7 in 2017), whereas mid-size companies with 101-250 employees saw staff miss 6.3 days. Across the UK, the East Midlands had the


highest number of days lost per employee with 6.9 days whereas Wales had the lowest at 4.4 days. www.makeuk.org


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BUSINESSES URGED TO SAVE LIVES BY PROMOTING GOOD SUN SAFETY


Thousands of skin cancer cases in the UK could be prevented if businesses develop ‘sun safety strategies’, the leading chartered body for health and safety professionals has warned. At least 1,500 new cases of non-melanoma


skin cancer (NMSC) and 240 new cases of malignant melanoma linked to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure at work are diagnosed in Britain each year. But 90 per cent of all skin cancer deaths can be


prevented if businesses – and their employees – take proper precautions. The Institution of Occupational Safety and


Health (IOSH) is urging employers to save lives by developing ‘sun safety strategies’ that include regular updates on the UV index from weather forecasts, minimising sun exposure in the middle of the day, potentially swapping jobs among team members at regular intervals, and asking employees to wear long-sleeved, loose-fitting tops and trousers. Mary Ogungbeje, research manager at IOSH,


said: “Both malignant melanoma and non- melanoma skin cancer are on the rise in Britain and Europe and sun exposure is the main cause. In Britain alone, skin cancer kills 60 workers a year, and outdoor workers are particularly at risk


due to the nature of their roles. “However, the majority of skin cancer deaths


can be prevented if people control their exposure to solar UV radiation. There are a range of ways businesses can adapt to better protect workers, from minimising exposure to direct sunlight in the middle part of the day to ensuring outdoor workers wear appropriate clothing.” IOSH says it is vital managers, workers and


the wider public understand the importance of good sun safety and make efforts to mitigate the risks. By being aware of the dangers of UV exposure and taking the necessary precautions, lives can be saved. exclusive.iosh.com


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INDUSTRIAL COMPLIANCE | SUMMER 2019


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