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FEA


FEAT RE ATURE


FAC LIACIILITIES MANAGEMEN


ESMANAGEMEN T SOLVING THE COMPLI ANCE PU ZZL E situation and constraints.


undertake a complia engineering services Initial steps are to


work with a facilities


nce assessment. The provider to


provider should use some form of assessment tool as well as consulting with key stakeholders on work activities and compliance management. The findings are then ratified through


completion of a scorecard and an audit of site-based evidence, which provides a baseline compliance score. This exercise enables compliance managers to undertake a gap analysis and identify areas of focus, risk mitigation and


management to form the basis a master compliance plan.


Adjusting m nufacturing processes so that they com ywth the latest gislati n i a necessary evi for faci tiesm nagers (FM ). How ecent egislat ve changes have caused some confusi n aroundwhat ld


Br n I business, advises howFMs can keep on top of ev


naging di ow


W hilst there has not been any dramatic changes to manufacturing


legislation recently, there has been a number of subtle amendments whic h may be more difficult to adhere to as the guidance is not always clear. A high- profile example of this is the renewed focus on phasing out potentially climate- damaging hydrofluorocarbon gases (HFCs), as outlined in The Paris Agreement which came into force on 4 November 2016. The Paris Agreement builds on the


,


preceding Montreal Protocol and includes a specific revision around the substances used primarily in refrigerat ion and air - conditioning equipment, with the onus on developed member states to further incrementally limit their production and usage of HFCs. Whilst actual targets are yet to be released, predictions are for a reduction of around 10% from 2019. Modern legislation is moving away from prescriptive mandates and becoming more consultative, based on


recommended practice and guidelines. A good example of this is the pollution prevention guidelines (PP Gs) which wer e withdrawn in December 2015, to be replaced by Guidance for Pollution Prevention (GPP) aimed at providing direction on best practice rather than insisting that specific actions be met. This was also seen in the Health and Safety Executive 4th revision in November


, 30 30 SPRI SPRING 201 2017 | ENERG MANAGEMEN ENERGY MANAGEMENT


Brian Imrie, managing director of adi Group’s faci ties engineeri business, advises how FMs can keep on top of ever-evolving Government guidelines and requirements to guarantee ongoing compliance


stingmanufacturing processes so that they complly with the latest legislation is a necessary evil for facilities managers (FMs). However, recent legislative changes have caused some confusion around what should be undertaken as part of a maintenance programme. Here, ctor of adi Group’s facilities engineering eve


ow ver, sh e, ver-ev evolvi gGove ov gui el es and requi ements to guarantee ongoing com ance


2013, relating to the control of Legionella bacteria in water systems (L8). The new ACoP and HSG274 guidancemoved towards a risk-basedmanagement approach covering key equipment that would be found inmanufacturing facilities such as evaporative cooling towers, hot and cold water systems and fire suppression systems.


Although this change in practice is


open to interpretation, it does constitute a framework for operation that allows FMs to best address and prioritise important issues and develop plans for less pressing items .


piece of plant or Compliance is


not just about getting a equipment serviced, it


data capture, an approach involvi requires a more


actions through


to closure or alternative d managing corrective ng suitable recording, holistic management


remediation where required.


The key is to be proactive and put plans and processes in place for impending changes, as well as adhering to current standards. This ensures manufacturing sites are always compliant and reduce s the risk of getting caught out with costly retrofit work. The old adage that ‘you can’t manage what you don’t measure’ is particularly pertinent when it comes to compliance; a successful management agenda is dependent on preparation, baselining and understanding of a site’s


Figure 1:


Figure 1: Concept and understanding of


Concept and understanding of


compliance management can vary massively


complexity of facilities systems


compliance management can vary massively depending on knowledge, experience and complexity of facilities systems


depending on knowledge, experience and


vernment rta rt o am nance progr e. Her


Achieving total compliance is a journey which may take several years to realise given operational and budget constraints.


current systems are However, the key is


operating safety an d to demonstrate that


are being monitored by a competent person or duty holder. Medium to long- term fixes can be established later, by working closely with regulatory bodies to develop a plan of action that works for all parties.


A common misconception amongst FMs is that significant and immediate investment is needed to rectify gaps in compliance. However, in many cases, simply amending process or maintenance regimes can manag e and mitigat e


immediate risk and this does not require vast amounts of cap Taking a proactive


an eye on the news agenda for


announcements thatmay potentially affect compliance, then putting plans in place to safeguard against any prospective changes before they cause an issue, is the key to staying compliant. While it may seem obvious, the practice of future- proofing is often sid elined in favour o f more pressing everyday tasks by time-poor FMs. However, dedicating a short amount of time to this practice on a regular basis can pay dividends in the future. The legislative landscape is so changeable that it is often hard to predict what will happen next. Energy efficiency initiatives in particular are often subj


bject to sudden change or


abolishment. For example, the 2019 Zero Carbon Non-Domestic target which was recently scrapped S o, as part of a regula r review process, facilities managers must also be flexible and modify their plan where circumstances dictate.


. adi Group adiltd.co.uk adiltd.co.uk T: 0121 451 2255 / ENERGYMANAGEMENT ENERGYMANAGEMENT


approach by keeping ital.


SOLVING THE COMPLIANCE PUZZLE


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