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FEA


FEAT RE ATURE


RENEWABLES AN LOW CARBO


RENEWABLES AND LOW CARBON ENERG EN ERG Y


LIGHTING UP THE UK WITH RENEWA gy, discusses the impact that ineffiiciient coal-powered streetlights are


JimSmyth having on the UK, and why carbon-saving wind and solar powe ow


LIGHTING UP THE UK WITH RENEWABLES Jim Smyth, CEO at Airsynergyat Airsynergy, discusses the impact that i eff c ent coal-powered streetl ghts are


WABLE S having on theUK, andwhy carbon-savi gwind and so r pow red streetlights are the ideal alternatives


means that power can be generated in any location imaginable. The technology that these lights contain means that the air can be accelerated at an increased pace thanks to the way they have bee n designed, providing a larger than


expected power output. These innovative streetlights also contain a turbine which can ‘cut in’ sooner and increase the output when there are low wind speeds; a critical feature which ensures reliable and powerful lightin


disruption to be min amajor benefit for c streetlights is also a The installation of


stress-free process, these revolutionary g.


imal. The streetlight s ouncils who require


are stand-alone and not connected to the grid, meaning no trenching or ducting, minimising costs. Instead, the drop-in solution can be installed in under a week, and provides immediate, secure power in any required location.


T


he safety cushion between the supply and demand of electricity is


significantly narrowing, primarily due to the closure of several coal power stations. The demand for electricity naturally becomes increasingly acute in the winter, where demand for lighting is higher due to the shorter days and longer nights. The UK is working to lessen this


pressure by easing its reliance on non- renewable energy resources. On May 9th 2016 and at several other times this year, the UK’s electricity was supplied without burning a single lump of coal. Instead, the UK is investing time a nd money int o utilising renewables. More than double the amount that was spent on new coal and gas fuelled power plants was spent on renewables in 2015. Consequently, renewable energy sources accounted for 25% of the UK’s total electricity generation at the end of 2015 .


RE-IIMAGINING I INEFFICIENT UK STR ETLI HTS


,


RE MAGINING NEFFICIEN UK STREETLIGHTS


ojects in abundance in the UK what we are failing to improve upon are our streetlights. The UK is home to six million streetlights which are providing power to our towns and cities. These necessity,


Whilst there has been clean energy proj


grounds, at schools or on o whether it be along streets streetlights are of course a


18 SPR 18 SPRIING 201 , at football ur pavements. 2017 | ENERG MANAGEMEN ENERGY MANAGEMENT


However, the current stock of UK streetlights are outdated and highly inefficient. It is estimated that UK local authorities spent £616 million on street lighting from 2013 to 2014. These streetlights account for between 15 and 30 per cent of a local authority’s total emissions. In looking for a viable


solution, UK councils chose to switch off or dim a number of streetlights between midnight and 5am in 2014 in an effort to combat high bills and emission levels. Out of 150 councils across the UK, 50


during the night switched off the


, and 98 chose to di m ir lights completely


them. When asked for their reasoning behind the switch off, two thirds of the respondents claimed that energy


efficiency was the most important factor .


WIND AND SOLAR POWERED STREETLIGHT


WIND AND SOLAR POWERED STR ETLI HT


A viable solution has arisen on themarket that doesn’t involve blackouts for


residents. Instead, an increasing number of councils are choosing to invest in energy-efficient, renewable powered streetlights. These revolutionary,multi- purpose streetlig panel and a smal


l duct augmented wind hts consist of a solar


turbine, which together generatemore than enough energy to light up UK streets. Certain hybrid powered streetlights contain patented technology, which


Figure 1: Figure 1: Certain hybrid powered


Cer ain hybrid powered streetlights containstreetlights contain patented technology,patented technology,


which means that power can be generated in any ocation imaginable


which means that power can be generated in any llocation imaginable


With this solution, councils are also able tomanage the brightness of the streetlights remotely. During school holidays, it would be highly inefficient for schools to continue to light the grounds, but with this solution the light can b e controlled and effectively conserved. This isn’t advised in residential areas due to safety concerns. For locations that require enhanced visibility, extra solar panels can be added to these smart streetlights .


, LIMIIMITLESS PO EN IAL ESS POTENTIAL


These streetlights not only generate reliable, renewable power, but excess power can also be generated to be used elsewhere. The streetlights can be fitted with security cameras to improve safety, they can fit USB ports to charge phones and laptops, or any excess can also be used to power loudspeakers at sports games. The applications are endless where these ground-breaking, versatile streetlights are concerned. The dominance of inefficient


streetlights is rightly dimming in the UK. The future for councils is renewable, reliable wind and solar powered streetlights which will not only sav e council’s money, but position the UK as a country which embraces renewable, cost-effective technologies.


www.airsynergy.ie


we e: info@airsynergy.ie


Airsynergy ww.


airsynergy.i / ENERGYMANAGEMENT ENERGYMANAGEMENT wered streetl ghts are the i eal alternati es


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