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ADVERTORIAL


TECHNOLOGY IN ACTION


4Sight Automatic Print Inspection System ‘Gets theMessage’


groundbreaking collaboration between SICK and AutoCoding Systems has resulted in the launch of the first fully-automatic smart vision inspection system for printed coding and marking on food, pharmaceutical and other consumer goods The


A


4Sight Automatic Print Inspection System packaging.


achieves significant savings in day-to-day production stoppages for producers. A breakthrough innovation achieved in the


LPS Vibration Transducers L oop powered transducers are self-contained 4-20mA


commonly accepted by process control systems such as a vibration transmitters. The 4-20 mA output is


versions with outputs proportional to acceleration, velocity vibration monitoring. The range of transducers include PLC, DCS or SCADA system for cost-effective continuous


output in addition to the 4-20mA output are also available. and displacement. Dual output types featuring a dynamic


Plus, hazardous area versions certified for both IS and Ex


accessories most industrial monitoring applications can areas. With an extensive range of mounting and cabling


be supported.


KDP Electronics Systems 


01767 651058  www.kdpes.co.uk Sick (UK) Ltd  01727 831121  www.sick.co.uk


AutoCoding 4Sight software, operating on SICK’s Inspector P smart vision camera, enables direct closed-loop communication of the printed message from any brand of printer using standard inkjet, laser or thermal transfer technologies.


The application, one of the first to be developed using SICK’s AppSpace software


platform, has delivered an error-proof, high-speed inspection system for printed codes such as dates, batch and line numbers. The new direct communication concept cuts out costly ‘nuisance stops’ and the time-consuming set-up that conventional vision systems need to be taught thousands of images and fonts, as well as the


context of the surrounding packaging design affecting the inspection.


“Working with SICK and using the power of the SICK AppSpace development environment, we were able to draw on the strengths of AutoCoding to think about print inspection systems in a completely new way,” explains Mike Hughes, Managing Director of AutoCoding Systems. “The result is a directly networked connection between the printer and the smart camera, coupled with the 4Sight software’s unique ability to self-optimise the code inspection process.”


“As the artificial intelligence is already pre-trained in the application, the AutoCoding system knows exactly the printed message it is looking for. So, the system adjusts automatically when the printer changes to a new job.


Accurate Flow Measurement of Corrosive Fluids


Industrial cameraswith fast interfaces complex inspection tasks. T They are available with a monochrome or colour image sensor and for


flexibility in image recording and high transmission speed of image inf he 16 new compact industrial cameras (BVS CA) in the Smart Vision Sol


utions line from Balluff give you great


fast data transmission with optional GigE- ormation for mastering even highly


Vision or USB3-Vision interface. Programming is according to the GEN<i>CAM-standard (Generic Interface for Cameras).


These compact cameras can be efficiently used in either of two ways. Either by access using common image editing software together with a separate industrial PC for data processing, or using the external SmartController from Balluff that runs the proven Balluff BVS-Cockpit software. With these industrial cameras the user benefits not only from perfectly resolved and tack sharp images, but also from a very high data transmission rate. The data results are passed from the controller via a freely definable interface to the control system through the standard interfaces TCP/


distant production facilities. Balluff


40 JUN E 2019 | PROCESS & CONTROL T


itan Enterprises reports how its Metraflow ultrasonic flowmeter has been selected by metering and water treatment com


pany to accurately a leading fluid


measure chemical disinfection dosing using sodium hypochlorite.


Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) is a highly corrosive liquid commonly used as an oxidizing and bleaching agent and as a disinfectant. These properties challenge component parts used in most flowmeters.


find their way over a fast Gigabit Ethernet network. The web-based product access enables remote access even from automation company - gets only the most important information, whereas data and images, e.g. for quality services, distribution of the information: if needed, with just the click of a mouse the process network - the heart of any P/IP, TCP UDP or PROFINET. A clever interface concept ensures correct addressing and


 01606 812 777  www.balluff.com


Neil Hannay, senior development engineer at Titan Enterprises commented "Our customer chose the Metraflow because its clean bore design is based upon a chemically resistant Perfluoralkoxy Alkane (PFA) tube onto which are mounted high sensitivity ultrasonic sensors. The excellent chemical stability of the single PFA flow tube, coupled with the lack of any connections or seals within the flowmeter itself, enable prolonged accurate flow measurement of corrosive fluids".


Titan Enterprises  


01935 812790 CONNECTINGINDUSTRY. M/PROCESS&CONTRO L


www.flowmeters.co.uk Y.CO


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