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PRODUCTS ENCLOSURES & ENCLOSURE FURNITURE


FAN COIL UNITS: DETECTING FAN FAILURE


The undetected failure of fan coil units (FCUs) is a long standing problem in heating and ventilation. However, Ecofit, in partnership with Axair, has developed a double inlet, forward curved, centrifugal fan. This features a highly efficient EC motor, surpassing ERP 2013 and 2015, plus a built-in monitoring system to detect the failure of fans within a system. The failures are monitored via a normally closed contact within the motor


which will open when the fan speed drops below 200rpm, but only when the fan is receiving a run command. This switch is controlled internally on the motor’s PCB by an optocoupler. This is used as it isolates the alarm circuitry from electromagnetic radiation that could cause false readings. The on-board alarm system is such that multiple fans can be wired in


series and powered either using the fan’s own 0-10v output or an external input from the BMS system, 48V 5mA max. The flexibility of EC allows for the customisation of the RMP ‘trigger’ point and whether the system operates normally closed or normally open. This circuitry within the fan’s printed circuit board will generate an alarm signal which the Building Management System will detect and respond accordingly. On-board alarms provide many advantages. For the end user: reduced


downtimes for maintenance, expensive building assets are running at optimum efficiency for longer, and productivity of the work space is maintained. For the fan coil manufacturer: no additional components are required to monitor tacho outputs before integration with the building management system, meaning reduced costs, quicker construction times and less complex assembly procedures.


Axair www.axair-fans.co.uk


CLIP-ON KNITTED WIRE MESH RFI/EMI SHIELDING GASKET STRIP INTRODUCED


Kemtron has launched a new clip-on knitted wire mesh RFI/EMI shielding gasket strip. This is a very flexible, easily compressible, sponge EPDM tubular or bulb type gasket strip with a steel spring clip covered with a double knitted wire mesh layer for RFI/EMI shielding. The clip-on gasket strip is supplied by EMKA, which ensures superior


quality and consistency of its gasket strips. Kemtron double knits the wire mesh over the strip at its Braintree factory. This clip-on seal provides a good RFI/EMI shield for enclosures and


electrical cabinets. The soft hollow bulb profile requires low closure force and makes the product particularly suitable for door applications where frequent opening and closing is required. The clip-on gasket is easy to fit and will bend up to 90˚. Furthermore, the knitted wire mesh gives very low contact resistance between mating surfaces ensuring good shielding. The choice of wire mesh material available also allows for a good


galvanic match with mating flanges, thereby limiting the possibility of corrosion between gasket and flange. Knitted wire choices are monel, stainless steel, aluminium and tin plated copper clad steel. Kemtron manufactures RFI/EMI shielding gaskets and components for all enclosure applications.


Kemtron www.kemtron.co.uk


“Kemtron manufactures RFI/EMI shielding gaskets and components for all enclosure applications”


RFI/EMI


shielding gaskets & components


Flock & Siemens


www.kemtron.co.uk +44 (0) 1376 348115 info@kemtron.co.uk S1 OCTOBER 2018 | DESIGN SOLUTIONS: SUPPLEMENT 4 


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