search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Test & measurement


250kVA, that are used to start up the engines and generate electricity. The air conditioning system works electrically too. The 787 has a so-called inerting system as standard. This extracts nitrogen from the air using a special filter system and directs it into the tanks. This reduces the oxygen percentage to such an extent that a fire cannot be triggered, even in the event of flying sparks. Jürg Dobler, member of the executive management. KELLER AG für Druckmesstechnik, says: “ There are currently around 40,000 pressure sensors from us in the air – 30,000 or so of which are just for regulating cabin pressure. The precise regulation of the cabin pressure is a clear added bonus for passengers comfort, particularly during take-off and landing. At present, practically the entire Airbus fleet, the Brazilian Embraer, the “Dreamliner” from Boeing and various business jets are flying with KELLER pressure measurement technology.” Dr Günther Kaden, aircraft sensors consultant, KELLER AG für Druckmesstechnik, adds: “KELLER’s pressure measurement technology has proven its reliability over hundreds of thousends flying hours. For example, error-free operating times of between 200,000 and 400,000 hours are required for cabin pressure sensors. In most cases, field data is hard to come by. However, some time ago, one of KELLER’s major clients confirmed that, over an observed year, an MTBF (mean time between failure) of more than one million hours could be detected – a figure that KELLER employees can be proud of.”


SAFE SPACE TRAVEL


The International Space Station (ISS) with ESA’s Columbus laboratory on board flies around the Earth at an average altitude of around 400 km at a good 28,800 km per hour. It therefore takes the station just 90 minutes to go around the Earth. For the astronauts, this translates as 16 sunrises and sunsets each day. Several space agencies have joined forces for the ISS project – the American NASA, the Russian Roskosmos, the European ESA, the Canadian CSA and the Japanese JAXA. The ISS was permanently inhabited by


astronauts for the first time in November 2000. The space station is a modular construction and now measures 110m x 100m x 30 m and weighs in at around 450 tons. The individual modular components were put into orbit by launchers and space shuttles and assembled there. The modular component of the European Columbus research laboratory was installed in February 2008 by the 16th long-term crew. The Columbus laboratory is the ESA’s greatest contribution to the station. Since May 2009, an average of six astronauts


have been working on the ISS. With the participants, the space station is suitable for operation until at least 2024. From a technical perspective, operation until 2028 is feasible.


Instrumentation Monthly October 2020


Commander Alexander Gerst from the European Space Agency (ESA) successfully installed the ACLS module on the International Space Station (ISS) on 24 October 2018


Continued on page 40... 39


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74