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ADVERTORIALS


ABACUS COLD MAINS WATER METER TYPE EM SCALED 0-999 LITRES IN STEPS OF 1 LITRE


hosepipes. Not very accurate and certainly no consistent. Now, Hertfordshire company Aquameter has developed the ABACUS digital water measuring system for dispensing accurate preset quantities of water straight into mixing vessels, tanks, etc. Easy to install and simple to use, the ABACUS delivers repeatable results day in, day out, reliably and consistently. Thousands of units have been sold worldwide to a whole variety of industries where water is added to powders or granules for mixing purposes. Just dial in the batch amount required and press the start button. The unit stops the flow of water when the required quantity has been delivered - easy.


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Aquameter Ltd u 01992 442 861 u www.aquameter.co.uk


COOLING CURVE MONITORING IN GLASS ANNEALING LEHRS


T


hermalert 4.0 spot pyrometers from Fluke Process Instruments enable precise


monitoring of critical glass manufacturing processes such as annealing of glass bottles and containers. The noncontact infrared sensors measure product as well as belt temperatures. That way, operators can ensure that the lehr is set correctly for products with different glass thicknesses and sizes, and that the transportation belt is heated correctly. The latter is especially important for glass containers with a thick bottom, to prevent uneven cooling and breakage. Continuous monitoring helps operators improve quality and uniformity and reduce reject rates. It also supports troubleshooting by detecting faulty burners under the transportation belt. The annealing process is designed to remove residual stress in formed containers. Obtaining the correct temperature and cooling curve is essential to achieve the required strength in the finished product.


Fluke Process Instruments u marcom2.emea@flukeprocessinstruments.de u www.flukeprocessinstruments.com


HBM LEADS THE WAY IN HARTPURY COLLEGE RESEARCH PROJECT


W


hen Hartpury College and University Centre


recently undertook a study to investigate canine gait analysis and force exerted on a lead in a collar and harness, HBM – a market leader in the field of test and measurement - was on hand to supply the necessary electronic strain gauges and software. As part of its research to


identify whether there is a significant difference in the gait of a dog when it is exercised using either a collar or a harness, and to analyse the degree of force exerted on the lead by the handler and the dog, Hartpury College specified the U9C strain gauge series from HBM to collect data on the amount of force experienced at the site of the dogs restraint. The compact and cost-effective U9C series reliably measures tensile and


compressive force where space is a constraint. HBM


Instrumentation November 2018 u 01525 304980 u www.hbm.com


SMART SAFETY SENSOR SRF FOR SMART FACTORIES


represents a really smart safety move at a time when the ongoing merging of automation and IT see Industry 4.0 move from vision to reality. The company, based on the Westgate Park Industrial Estate in Aldridge, Walsall, has introduced the non- contact Smart Safety Sensor SRF, to protect those working in Smart Factories from injury. The SRF – an abbreviation of Safety RFID – is an especially compact sensor which monitors moveable separating protective equipment such as flaps, doors and protection hoods. If, for any reason, these separating safety devices fail to close properly, the SRF immediately shuts down machines and equipment – or prevents them from starting. In developing this new product, Bernstein has paid particular attention to the diagnostic system accompanying the sensor which provides a large amount of data, making it available centrally and flexibly as an aid to intelligent production.


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Bernstein Ltd u 01922 744-999


u www.bernstein-ltd.co.uk


PRESSURE TRANSMITTERS AND LEVEL SENSORS WITH DIGITAL INTERFACES


make them ideal for battery-operated and wireless applications. Pressure ranges: 0,3… 1000 bar / ATEX Approval / Pressure and temperature data


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D Line pressure transmitters I2


C interface up to cable lengths of 5 m


1,8…3,6 V (optimised for button cells) 20 μW at 1 S/s and 1,8 V Total error band ± 0,7 %FS at -10…80 °C


Keller u 0845 6432855


X Line pressure transmitters RS485 interface up to cable lengths of 1,4 km 3,2…32 V (optimised for 3,6 V lithium batteries) 100 μW at 1 S/min. and 3,2 V Total error band ± 0,1 %FS at -10…80 °C


u www.keller-druck.com 41


ressure transmitters and level sensors with digital interfaces are perfect for customised solutions. Their low supply voltage and optimised power consumption


witched on industrial safety technology provider Bernstein AG’s latest product


dding a preset quantity of water to a mix has long been carried out using pails or


HIGH PERFORMANCE INCLINOMETER T


he SST300 is a high performance inclinometer utilising advanced MEMS sensor technology to ensure maximum reliability in the


harshest environment. The SST300 is also very flexible in the choice of configuration, i.e. measurement range, data output options, temperature compensation, housings and functionality. Typically, ranges from ± 5° to ± 60° in both single and dual axis versions with data output formats that include, voltage, current (4-20mA), RS232/485, CAN, USB and Wi-Fi.


With a range of accessories to match, the SST300 is ideal for applications include marine, civil engineering, platform levelling, drilling, vehicle behaviour and many others.


KDP Electronics Systems u 01767 651058 u www.kdpes.co.uk


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