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Internet of Things


Living in the smart city of tomorrow B


Smart cities can only ever reach their potential if they are able to share data effectively. This requires trust, data- privacy tools, and ways to control data sharing, either openly or selectively, with ecosystem partners. Most importantly, it requires an open standards approach that allows public and private sector organisations to collaborate strategically for the long term. To try and ensure smart cities can enable good standards of living in a sustainable environment, the International Institute of Information Technology, Hyderabad (IIIT-H) has developed India’s First Living Lab for IoT based smart city implementations. Dr. Sachin Chaudhari, assistant professor at IIIT-H, takes up the story...


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ack in 2015, the Government of India launched its ‘100 smart cities’ vision, which is


to implement smart solutions in cities across the country by 2022. This mission is expected to be a key enabler for IoT adoption across multiple industries including utilities, manufacturing, automotive and transportation and logistics. Presenting a golden opportunity for local governments to adopt a more convenient, safer and smarter way of operating, interoperability between Internet of Things (IoT) devices is crucial to develop a reliable network, that will support any kind of application over the same infrastructure. To try and ensure smart cities can


enable good standards of living in a sustainable environment, the International Institute of Information Technology, Hyderabad (IIIT-H) has developed India’s First Living Lab for IoT based smart city implementations. Taking inspiration from India’s Smart City Mission, aiming to develop 130 cities across the country, the Lab will be crucial to the future of India.


OverCOMIng THe HurDLeS Cities are complex, networked and continuously changing social ecosystems, shaped and transformed


through the interaction of different interests and ambitions. Ensuring employment, sustainable development, and quality of life are important concerns. Along with this, there is also a diversity of services to be addressed such as healthcare, energy, education, environmental management, transportation and mobility, and public safety. Increasingly, these services are enabled by broadband infrastructures, wireless sensor networks, internet-based networked applications, open data and open platforms. While emerging vendors are


working towards full interoperability that will allow applications to share information, this remains a challenge for mass consumerisation, meaning the Indian IoT ecosystem will never reach its full potential if a standardised IoT framework is not in place. By selecting a horizontal IoT platform, it eliminates vendor lock-in and ensures smart city deployments are highly scalable and cost-effective as it continues to gain pace across the globe. Each city will also have its own


smart priorities and vision and therefore, deployment strategies will differ. In line with this, the Government of India aims to focus on implementing innovative digital technologies - under its Smart City Mission - by providing solutions


November 2020 Instrumentation Monthly


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