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Test & measurement


Digitalisation for everyone


Thanks to digitalisation, production system users do not just receive more or better data for analysis. A new solution from Endress+ Hauser means they even have access to data that they have been unable to capture so far. In combination with the Netilion IIoT ecosystem, the FWR30 level sensor makes it possible to measure the fill levels in portable containers. After one- time commissioning, the FWR30, which can be mounted on IBCs in a matter of minutes, sends the measurement values to the cloud at regular intervals using wireless technology. Endress+Hauser’s Florian Kraftschik takes up the story.


26 T


he FWR30 is housed in an inconspicuous gray enclosure that is mounted on the


intermediate bulk container (IBC) with the help of an installation kit. IBCs are stackable containers used in many countries for the storage and transportation of liquids. They have numerous applications in the chemical and food industries and are even widely used in the water and wastewater sector. What these containers all have in common is that they are often used at decentralised locations and are frequently transported, such as when they have to be refilled. Typical media found in IBCs includes cleaning agents, additives, concrete liquefiers or precipitators for phosphate in wastewater treatment plants. Some of these liquids are perishable and as a result are held only in smaller reserves. To date, IBC operators could only


approximate the levels in the containers for these applications since they could not be automatically measured. This also applies to the suppliers and distributors responsible for ensuring the availability of the stored media in the IBCs at the production sites. In cases where the fill levels still needed to be determined, the employees had to drive to all of the


IBCs and manually carry out the measurements, a time-consuming activity that furthermore supplied no data down to the minute, hour or even day. For operators, transparency regarding the fill levels or inventories is important. IBCs are typically used at sites where there is little opportunity to carry out measurements, either due to a lack of cable connectivity to the process control system or because running dedicated cables for the level measurements is too costly. In combination with the Netilion IIoT


ecosystem, the Micropilot FWR30 makes it possible to have access to the fill levels and know where the container is currently located, at any time and from anywhere. This wireless instrument runs on battery with a battery life of up to 15 years.


Digital measurement point in three minutes


The instrument design and the wireless connectivity to the cloud via the mobile phone network makes set-up and digitalisation of the measurement point fast and easy, even when compared to the commissioning of a conventional level measurement point connected to the process control system. After three


November 2020 Instrumentation Monthly


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