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Internet of Things


Gas Sensing and IoT Sensors


is changing the way we live. It is the concept of connecting any object to the Internet and other connected devices. The network of connected devices collect and share data about the way they are used and about the environment around them. Essentially, an IoT device is something that has an internet connection when it usually should not. Objects are designed with built in sensors that


T


are connected to an Internet of Things platform, which collates and analyses the data. Depending on the purpose, this information can be used to detect patterns, make recommendations and detect any possible problems. The IoT is all around us from the moment we wake up. Examples range from self-driving cars


he Internet of Things (IoT) is a growing topic of conversation and interest is increasing as technology advances, which


with sensors that can detect objects in their path, to fitness devices that measure heart rate and daily steps. Even appliances such as security cameras, smart light bulbs and speaker systems fall under the category of the IoT. An increasing number of devices are being


created with Wi-Fi capabilities. According to data from IoT Analytics, there are roughly seven billion IoT devices in existence, and this number is set to explode in the following years as internet consumption rises and new technologies hit the market. Intel have predicted that the global market for IoT technology will reach $6.2 trillion by 2025.


Internet of thIngs sensors


As the IoT industry grows, so does the oppor tunity to utilise sensors. Sensors are devices that detect and respond to changes in


an environment, with inputs ranging from a variety of sources including light, temperature, motion and pressure. Sensors output valuable information and if they are connected to a network such as the IoT, they can share this data with other connected devices and management systems. Gas sensors in par ticular can be used to


monitor and detect changes in air quality, including the presence of toxic, combustible or hazardous gases. Industries using gas sensors include mining, oil and gas, chemical research and manufacturing. A common consumer purpose is the use of carbon dioxide detectors in many homes. When gas sensors are connected to the internet through the IoT, this valuable data can be used to inform of impor tant changes in air quality, which may have detrimental consequences to human health or the environment for example.


smart farmIng and the use of gas sensors


Smar t farming has been referred to as the ‘key for the future of agriculture’ by the World Health Organisation. It is an agricultural management concept that uses modern technology and the Internet of Things to increase the quantity and quality of farming produce. When farmers have access to technologies such as GPS, soil scanning and data management through the internet, they can precisely measure variations within their farm and adapt a strategy accordingly. For


54 November 2020 Instrumentation Monthly


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