search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Insights > Construction Gatehouse Road, Aylesbury.


“IT WAS CENTRAL TO OUR VISION TO MAKE THIS A GREAT PLACE TO LIVE THAT INCLUDED PRIVATE GARDENS AND COMMUNAL SPACES.” Mark Lowe


is vital, and most effective, in getting the community on board. As this last comment implies, getting local people behind new council housing projects is vital to their success – especially in a country with such strict planning laws. Support from the powers-that-be is crucial too. Yet it’s clear that even beyond Camden and Aylesbury, councils are again willing to back ambitious new social housing projects. A good example comes from Nottingham, where Mark Lowe, together with the council’s arms-length management organisation, have helped redevelop the site of Lenton’s benighted towers into something far more appealing. As Lowe puts it: “It was central to our vision to make this a great place to


LEAF REVIEW / www.leading-architects.com


live that included private gardens and communal spaces.”


The similarities with Camden


and Aylesbury don’t end there. Like Gatehouse Road, Lenton Gardens, as it’s known, refuses to be ghettoised, and is arranged to encourage pedestrians and cyclists. Like Holmes Road, it’s designed with a deep sense of history, the blue brick patterns adorning its family homes a twenty- first century nod to the terracotta detailing of nearby Edwardian homes. Legoland, or anything like it, is nowhere to be found.


An Englishman’s home is his playground


Lenton Gardens has already secured 145 new council-owned homes for the


people of Nottingham, while a nearby apartment block offers 57 more flats for older residents. Nor is the Midlands city alone. In the seven years since 2012, London councils have built over 2,000 social houses. In the seven years before 2012, they managed a mere 70. Camden Council, the erstwhile employer of Sydney Cook, has 3,000 new properties planned over the next 15 years.


More broadly, Fraser wonders whether this move to softer, more humane forms of domestic architecture could herald a broader shift in how the British think about their towns and cities. He describes his experiences of the Netherlands, where more relaxed attitudes towards privacy and personal space mean


that streets are often scattered with people chatting and dining out. It goes without saying that creating a similar atmosphere in Birmingham or Bristol is far easier when the places people live are right on the street, forcing interaction whether their isolationist sensibilities want it or not. “It's more dynamic and lively,” Fraser summarises. All good news – yet the battle to build a new generation of council accommodation is far from over. As Barber points out, a city like London is one of the richest the world has ever seen, yet hosts 7,000 street dwellers and 150,000 more in insecure accommodation. Much progress has been made, in other words, but Lloyd George’s pledge in that extinguished, sepia-toned world remains just that.


21


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41