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Insights > Special report


The notion that good architecture has a certain poetry to it is an overused metaphor, but moves to install poets in residence at prestigious architectural firms have now gone beyond mere wordplay. Evidence even suggests these figures are playing a formative role in shaping how buildings are conceived. Mae Losasso speaks to contemporary architect Patrick Lynch, and poet and architect Fawzia Muradali Kane to explore what impact poetry has on the way we build and experience urban environments.


THE POETIC FORM L


ondon architect Patrick Lynch is working on a top secret project; when I arrive at his Regent’s Canal-side studio, he’s adding the finishing touches to the 3D mockup. From up here, six storeys high in the heart of Hackney, there are views


across the city that catch the edge of the greenbelt south of Greenwich. It must be an architect’s dream, a place from which to see London unfolding in a network of church steeples, railway lines, and canal paths, punctured by the skyscrapers rising on the skyline.


“We need thematic spatial descriptions, as well as actual architecture,” Lynch tells his team, as they finesse the 3D project. Though he can’t divulge the specifics of the competition scheme, Lynch talks of building “poetic structures


for understanding”, of the “poetics of making and the poetics of meaning”, of “bodily rhythmic experiences”, and processes of “immersion and reflection”. Because, for Lynch, everything is poetry. From design, to form, to use, there’s simply


Antony Gormley Statue on the River Thames – the inspiration behind Fawzia Muraldi Kane's poem Limehouse Reach.


LEAF REVIEW / www.leading-architects.com 11


eric laudonien/Shutterstock.com


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