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WORLDWIDE TAXI FOCUS from Greece


ATHENS TAXI DRIVERS PROTEST DEMANDING HELP AMID VIRUS


Taxis lined the roads as drivers held a protest in central Athens on Thursday 4 March demanding financial assistance and tax cuts, as Greek authorities introduced new Covid restrictions following a spike in infections. Republic World reports that Greeks woke up to a new set of restrictions on Thursday with police now able to target people making false exercise claims to bypass stay-at-home orders as part of tougher new measures. Permission to visit banks and supermarkets is now only permitted in a two-kilometer radius of each person’s home, while those wishing to exercise can not use their vehicles or public transport to travel to that outing. Virus infections continue to rise in Greece, despite four months of lockdown measures. Most residents in the country can only leave their homes using a number-categorised permission system, normally requested and granted via SMS message.


A new government body is being established to spearhead EV-related policy and consultations will be held later in March over private sector participation. “These measures will support Singapore’s targets to cease new diesel car and taxi registrations from 2025, require all new car and taxi registrations to be of cleaner-energy models from 2030, and have all vehicles run on cleaner energy by 2040,” the LTA said.


from Ireland


PEOPLE IN DUBLIN COULD SOON BOOK E-SCOOTERS WITH FREE NOW TAXI APP


from Singapore


SINGAPORE WON’T ALLOW NEW DIESEL CARS AND CABS FROM 2025


Singapore won’t allow diesel-powered taxis to be registered from 2025, five years ahead of previously scheduled, as part of its push to reduce emissions and encourage use of EVs. According to the Financial Post, about 2.9% of passenger cars in Singapore run on diesel, while the proportion is as high as 41.5% for taxis, according to Land Transport Authority figures. Most goods vehicles and buses in the city-state run on diesel and won’t be affected by the new rule announced by the government. Singapore plans to install 60,000 EV charging stations by 2030, two-thirds of which will be in public car parks and the remainder on private premises, the LTA said in a statement.


APRIL 2021


People in Dublin could soon book e-scooters through the Free Now taxi app. Accoring to DublinLive, the popular app has announced that it has partnered with micro- mobility operator Tier. The partnership with Free Now will be launched across eight German cities next month, followed by France before it’s rolled out on a wider European scale. The plan reportedly includes an Irish rollout as long as Tier can successfully launch an e-scooter rental scheme in one or more Irish cities. A recent passenger survey revealed that 59% of people said they would like to see additional options available for trans- port in the app. Niall Carson, Free Now’s general manager, said: “Our new partnership with Tier is another key milestone in the growth of Free Now’s multi-mobility offering to passengers in cities across Europe. “‘In the Irish market, we welcome this announcement and are working closely with Tier and other leading micro-mobility providers to offer passengers a broader range of transport options in the future. “Already in other markets such as Germany and soon in France, we have a mix of taxis, e-scooters, e-bikes, e-mopeds, and car-sharing on the Free Now app, offering a more integrated approach and we look forward to expanding this further in Ireland.” This comes after the Irish Government announced that it will legalise e-scooters on roads in the coming months.


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